hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 928 results in 263 document sections:

... 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
The Daily Dispatch: April 6, 1864., [Electronic resource], The military despotism in the United States--speech of Senator Saulsbury. (search)
ied by the President; provided, too, they would support his proclamation!--Mighty man! Oh! what meat is this on which our modern Casar feeds that he has grown so great! He quoted at length from Plutarch's "Life of Pompey," and drew a parallel between Casar and Lincoln. It would be seen that our President was not the first man in the world who had sent soldiers to control elections. He did not know whether the President had read Plutarch, though he understood that he was well versed in Shakespeare, and considered the passage, "Oh! my of fence is rank!" one of the best. [Laughter.] He held that there was a fixed purpose, and everything is being done to perpetuate the powers of the President for four years, and if this attempt was unrebuked by the people by their votes, this President, with his army, will defy the American people after the next term of four years shall expire. If he does not he will be an extraordinary man. He appealed from Casar to the Senate, and invoked it
s stars of the first magnitude — as unequalled and inimitable delineators of Shakespeare, and what George styled the "legitimate drama."They, or rather George, was tsture and assurance. Before he came here he had taken the fame and glory of Shakespeare under his particular direction, had made a flaming oration in Avon, in England, on the occasion of the grand Shakespeare jubilee there, and cut divers capers in lectures on the drama and in pitched battles in debate with New England Divines Yes. And a historian? Yes. Oh, dear me, but perhaps he is fond of reading Shakespeare? Oh, no doubt; he saved Shakespeare's house. Oh, that's enough; if he reads Shakespeare, and saved Shakespeare's house, he'll not enter my house. And they fell back on an old millionaire, upwards of sixty. That's the ring of the Boston horge the Second. [Applause, with a few cries of "Never"] in the language of Shakespeare, I may say without witchcraft, all hail — not Macbeth — but all hail McClell<
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], A Yankee description of Garibaldi in London. (search)
nticipated that the police courts would reap (as they did) fewer cases than ever before from a London crowd. Slowly the procession crept by us, for the people miles off were blocking the way to cheer the hero. As the banners passed I interested myself in observing the immense number of Societies, Unions, Clubs, &c., whose existence was indicated. Societies passed with all sorts and kinds of symbols — suns, moons, stars, ladders, fishes, implements, tools, birds, beasts, men, women, Shakespeare, Peel, Kings, Queens, all these, amid showers of symbols, passed by on flags whose age announced that they were societies of long standing. But, alas for the teetotalers, only one poor little temperance flag passed, and that, I am bound to say, was greeted with loud and real laughter. If the total abstinence folks in England wish to succeed, they will have to make friends with the poor man's beer. However, I should add that during the whole day I saw neither drunken man or woman, excep
nticipated that the police courts would reap (as they did) fewer cases than ever before from a London crowd. Slowly the procession crept by us, for the people miles off were blocking the way to cheer the hero. As the banners passed I interested myself in observing the immense number of Societies, Unions, Clubs, &c., whose existence was indicated. Societies passed with all sorts and kinds of symbols — suns, moons, stars, ladders, fishes, implements, tools, birds, beasts, men, women, Shakespeare, Peel, Kings, Queens, all these, amid showers of symbols, passed by on flags whose age announced that they were societies of long standing. But, alas for the teetotalers, only one poor little temperance flag passed, and that, I am bound to say, was greeted with loud and real laughter. If the total abstinence folks in England wish to succeed, they will have to make friends with the poor man's beer. However, I should add that during the whole day I saw neither drunken man or woman, excep
the Yankee spirit rappers. Their spirits always come when called for in the regular way. To be sure they do not generally appear to have been greatly improved by their residence in the other world, so far as style and language is concerned. Shakespeare, for instance, having been summoned from his long home to dictate a play to some Yankee recording clerk, makes quite a botch of the thing, and Byron, Moore, and Scott have all, under the same circumstances, failed in a manner that would have gembia to Cape Horn. This is certainly important, if true, as the newspapers say. But it appears to us as though the atmosphere of Elysium had not been more favorable to the development of the General's prophetical powers than to the poetry of Shakespeare and his brother birds. While still in the flesh he was thought to be a clear headed and far sighted man — a skillful politician, and a sagacious statement. If he would leave his present residence long enough to take a trip through the countr
essels to take themselves and families away--one of the vessels to go to Marseilles, two to Malts, and the other to Tripoli. A copy of the first edition of Shakespeare's works was sold this week for £ 53. By way of contrast, we may mention that an enterprising publisher is issuing Shakespeare's plays at two for a penny. Shakespeare's plays at two for a penny. A celebrated character died at Innspruck recently, Cugeton Swith, aged 79. He was an intimate friend of Hofer, and was a famous guerrilla chief himself. The University of Berlin has now, for the first time, advanced a Jew to the grade of doctor-in law; he is a Russian subject, named Bernstein. A Vienna telegram reports t, and only six could be procured at the last examination. It is said the French Government wish to purchase the Great Eastern. Sporting journals claim Shakespeare to have been a keen fox hunter! The Emperor Napoleon III is having a magnificent yacht built as a present for the Emperor and Empress of Mexico. Calcu
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack?
that? I guess not. Then, above all, the big cotton crops, with a big nigger in the bale, the big commissions and the big commerce proceeding therefrom. Wonderful that all this love of bigness has never produced anything big but big fortunes and big luxury. It has never brought forth a big spies like Homer, or a big Coliseum like that where eighty thousand Romans witnessed the combats of the gladiators; or a big church like St. Peters; a big philosopher like Bacon; a big poet like Shakespeare; a big orator like Chatham; a big soldier like the "little Corsican." --But that is not the kind of bigness adapted to Yankee capacities. A mammoth ox or an overgrown prize-fighter, like the Goliath who went across the ocean to take the starch out of John Bull's collar, and came back in a very rumpled and placid condition, is the bean ideal of Yankee bigness. It may seem strange that a people themselves so little should have such a passion for all that is big. But that is in accorda
What a world this would be if all its inhabitants could say, with Shakespeare's shepherd: "Sir, I am a true laborer; I earn what I wear; owe no man hate; envy no man's happiness; glad of other men's good; content with my farm!"
tion. In the audience the American ladies sustained the comparison with all that Paris has of elegance and beauty in the feminine world; so that our great poet, Hugo, will no longer dare to say of America: "'Peuple a peine ebauche nation de hasard, Sans tige, sans passe, sans histoire et sans art!. "But when he wrote these two terrible lines the Americans had only produced steamboats swifter than the arrow and red spider wagons. The melancholy and sublime Edgar Poe had not yet given us those wonderful tales which revealed to us an ecstatic life, nor those strangely moving poems which strike so deliciously the cords of our souls. Now that his volumes have become for each of us a faithfully loved and faithfully read friend, no one can longer deny the poetry which the New World gives us in the enenantment of its forests and rivers. Edgar Poe has in himself a power of emotion equal, perhaps, to that of Shakespeare, and if America had but him she would still be rich."
... 21 22 23 24 25 26 27