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ary, 1838, for a quarter of a century he has ruled the most populous and most influential diocese belonging to his church in the once United States.--Of commanding intellect, and an eloquent preacher, he has long been looked to by the Roman Catholics of the North as at once the ornament and defence of their oft-assailed creed. An Irishman by birth, he belonged to a generation of exiles that remembered, perhaps felt, the remorseless tyranny of the British Government during the insurrection of 1798, when that unhappy country was delivered up to the unbridled license of a brutal soldiery, animated with the fierce hatred of an opposite creed. An enthusiastic Irishman, he remembered and resented the wrongs of his native land, and hence, was ever found in the ranks of those who have struggled through good report and evil report to free "Green Erin" from British rule. This cherished object has been the favorite day dream of thousands of intelligent Irishmen, who fondly hope the day may
The Daily Dispatch: January 23, 1864., [Electronic resource], The New Confederate cruiser Rappahannock. (search)
e about thirty years of age; his officers not more than twenty to twenty- four. The majority of them were in the old United States navy, but on the breaking out of the war resigned, and east their lots with those of their section. That age does not give experience of war fare, but often most loft acts of heroism are performed. Gen. Bonaparte was but twenty five when he made the first campaign of Italy. The Captain of the frigate Glory, in his five brilliant engagements off the coast of troland with the English in 1798, was but twenty nine. Imagination becomes inflamed with love of country and disenthralled of an odious yoker; nance it is not difficult to conceive that these young Americans, finding themselves similarity situated as their fathers were in 1776, will battle fiercely with their brothers of yesterday, but to-day enemies. We are told that orders have been received from Paris to give the Rappahannock full liberty as to her movements. The vessel is from Sheerness.
the right of local self government. Let us not be so cowardly as not to maintain, against the shallow school books, and the shallow school masters, and preachers, and teachers, and lecturers of New England, those glorious conditions of religious, family and individual liberties, of which New England, from her pestiferous foundation, has been the bigoted foe and persecutor-- everywhere. Oh! for one man, with the additional power and the public position and prestige that Jefferson had in 1798, when the Federal Union was at the paint of death, while yet in its baby clothes! Oh! for even a moderate number of stern and hardy free men, such as then blessed these now distracted and desalted States, to give to Jeffersonian ideas, body and political practical force. Rather, we cry, rouse up friends! You, readers of our journal, are already more than enough! Do, every man of you, all that he can! Only every other man you can! The principles of simple, integral, Jeffersonian Demo
rit of habeas corpus with the veto which the law places in the hands of the sovereign, and which, it is said, has not been exercised since the revolution. The Fayetteville Observer has been at parlor to ascertain the number of times the habeas corpus has been suspended since that period, and the result is anything but complimentary to Gov. Brown's historical proficiency. Between 1689 and 1794, it had been suspended nine times. It was suspended throughout the British Isles in that year. In 1798 it was suspended in Ireland during the rebellion, and again in 1803, during the insurrection headed by Robert Emmett. During the remainder of George 3d's reign it was several times suspended in England, and again during the reign of George 4th in 1822. Gov. Brown surely recollects the commotions in Ireland, about fifteen years ago, and the suspension of the writ during the time of their continuance. Indeed, it is the first thing a Minister does when there is trouble in the country, and woul
ic President for the next term. After the usual display of fine dishes, delicate and savory to the palates of epicures. The Chairman announced that the Hon. John McKeon could not attend, but read a letter explaining the reason of his absence. The following is a list of the regular toasts of the evening in the order in which they came: 1. The memory of Thomas Jefferson — Standing, in silence. 2. The Constitution of the United States--Interpreted by the resolutions of 1798 and '99; sustained by the State Rights Democracy for sixty years; overthrown by Abolitionism since 1860. 3. The supremacy of the civil power over the military. Let us hope that the repeated violation of this principle with impunity by Abraham Lincoln and his minions has been but a temporary ascendancy of brute force, over freedom of opinion among a people who were born free. 4. The Dred Scott decision — The enunciation of the great truth that this is a white man's government. Pulsie
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], Averill's Raid — Attack at Dublin Depot. (search)
he troops. And they not only passed, but returned, only one of their number being intercepted by the vast naval force of England! In 1791 a French squadron again passed a British fleet with perfect impunity. The same thing occurred twice in 1798, when the immense British fleets failed to prevent the landing of Gen. Humbert's army, and later in the year, when a French squadron of nine vessels and three thousand men escaped Sir J. B. Warren's squadron and safely reached the coast of Ireland. The escape of the Toulon fleet, in 1798, from that vigilant and energetic commander, Lord Nelson, was still more remarkable. There were in this fleet forty ships of war and an immense fleet of transports, making in all three hundred sail, and carrying forty thousand troops. Its destination was Malta, and it slipped out of port, followed by Nelson, who tried two courses for Alexandria, and missed the French in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous, the fleets actually crossed e
he troops. And they not only passed, but returned, only one of their number being intercepted by the vast naval force of England! In 1791 a French squadron again passed a British fleet with perfect impunity. The same thing occurred twice in 1798, when the immense British fleets failed to prevent the landing of Gen. Humbert's army, and later in the year, when a French squadron of nine vessels and three thousand men escaped Sir J. B. Warren's squadron and safely reached the coast of Ireland. The escape of the Toulon fleet, in 1798, from that vigilant and energetic commander, Lord Nelson, was still more remarkable. There were in this fleet forty ships of war and an immense fleet of transports, making in all three hundred sail, and carrying forty thousand troops. Its destination was Malta, and it slipped out of port, followed by Nelson, who tried two courses for Alexandria, and missed the French in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous; the fleets actually crossed e
mocrat hearing it to tingle with shame for listening to a moral traitor. Altogether the tenor of the assemblage was much more conservative than that at Peoria on the 3d. In point of numbers, I should estimate it at about four thousand. Everything passed off in quiet so far as known. I send a brief synopsis of the resolutions passed, to wit: Resolution first re-affirms the devotion of the Democracy to the Constitution and Union, and also to the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions of 1798 and 1799; further, that the Democracy of Illinois reiterate and adopt the resolutions of the Democratic State Convention of January, 1861, which disapproves of coercion as bringing on the horrors of civil war. How far the purpose of resistance in Indiana may go, may be gathered from the fact that an immense amount of arms has been imported into that State, and by the following extract from a letter dated at Indianapolis, August 19th: Facts, just come to light, put a new face on the
er January 1st, 1808. An act in Great Britain in 1807 also made the slave trade unlawful. Denmark made a similar prohibition as to her colonies, to take effect after 1804. The Congress of Vienna, in 1815, pronounced for the abolition of the trade. France abolished it in 1807. Spain, to take effect after 1820. Portugal abolished it in 1818. The slave trade continued in despite of the abolition. The average number of slaves exported from the coast of Africa averaged 85,000 per annum from 1798 to 1805; and from 1835 to 1840 there was a total of 135,810; in 1846 and 1847, it was 84,000 per annum. Between 1840 and 1847, 249,800 were taken to Brazil and 52,027 into the Spanish colonies. Slavery was abolished in Pennsylvania in 1780. In New Jersey, it was provisionally abolished in 1784; all children born of a slave after 1804 to be made free in 1820. In Massachusetts, it was declared after the Revolution that slavery was virtually abolished by their constitution (1780). In 178
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