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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource].

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he Art Association of this city. It is situated opposite the War Department, and is rapidly approaching completion. On one corner, the initials "W. W. C." are plainly visible. A great deal of wit has been expended in making words to these letters, "What Wealth Creates" being the most common interpretation. It is said that these translations have been brought to the ear of the wealthy banker, and annoy him not a little. More of these improvements will be noticed in another letter. Mr. Bocock, in view of the Union resolutions poured into the House, and the change in the Northern press, (Forney, for example, once so bitter, now begging like a dog to let the South have all it wants,) thinks there is some hope for the Union, but only by a reconstruction, after its dissolution, (in part at least,) into its original elements. He is of opinion that changes, very simple in character, can be made in the Constitution, by which it will be impossible for the North, no matter how powerful
ouse gallery, the resolutions of the several States touching such action as may be deemed necessary to preserve the Union are being read by a Clerk who hesitates at every other word. When these resolutions come to be read en masse, I suspect it will be discovered that the North is becoming alive to the crisis, and are willing to testify their sense of the value of the Union in the most unequivocal manner. But this testimony, extorted by fear of disunion, should be accepted cum grano salis. Bigler well said yesterday, that the hearts of the people must be changed. The Union men appear to be in somewhat better spirits, but the other side tell me that the matter is now far beyond the reach of Congress. The Cotton States cannot be prevented from going out of the Union, and, once out, it is almost certain that they will never unite again with any free-soil State. It seems impossible to make the politicians of the North realize this fact. Witness the philosophic braidings of the Tr
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 9
his fact. Witness the philosophic braidings of the Tribune's Washington correspondent. Property holders here are deriving some consolation from the dictum of a Maryland gentleman--"the metaphysician of America," as he is styled — who declares that no matter what division may take place, Washington is bound to be the Capital of some Confederacy or other. When the Speaker called for resolutions looking to the perpetuation of the Union from the States of South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, no answer was made. When Mississippi was called, Barksdale rose and said a few words which I could not catch. Some changes are noticeable since I was here a year or so ago. Along Pennsylvania Avenue two or three tall, handsome buildings may be seen. They are business houses, or else stores with boarding-houses above. Corcoran is building a large and very stylish house for the use and benefit of the Art Association of this city. It is situated opposite the War Department, and is ra
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
rth realize this fact. Witness the philosophic braidings of the Tribune's Washington correspondent. Property holders here are deriving some consolation from the dictum of a Maryland gentleman--"the metaphysician of America," as he is styled — who declares that no matter what division may take place, Washington is bound to be the Capital of some Confederacy or other. When the Speaker called for resolutions looking to the perpetuation of the Union from the States of South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, no answer was made. When Mississippi was called, Barksdale rose and said a few words which I could not catch. Some changes are noticeable since I was here a year or so ago. Along Pennsylvania Avenue two or three tall, handsome buildings may be seen. They are business houses, or else stores with boarding-houses above. Corcoran is building a large and very stylish house for the use and benefit of the Art Association of this city. It is situated opposite the War Departme
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 9
ans of the North realize this fact. Witness the philosophic braidings of the Tribune's Washington correspondent. Property holders here are deriving some consolation from the dictum of a Maryland gentleman--"the metaphysician of America," as he is styled — who declares that no matter what division may take place, Washington is bound to be the Capital of some Confederacy or other. When the Speaker called for resolutions looking to the perpetuation of the Union from the States of South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, no answer was made. When Mississippi was called, Barksdale rose and said a few words which I could not catch. Some changes are noticeable since I was here a year or so ago. Along Pennsylvania Avenue two or three tall, handsome buildings may be seen. They are business houses, or else stores with boarding-houses above. Corcoran is building a large and very stylish house for the use and benefit of the Art Association of this city. It is situated opposite the
United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
the Dispatch.] Washington, Dec. 12, 1860. The plan hinted at in my letter of day before yesterday, is, in brief, this: So to manage when the Electoral College declares Lincoln elected, that there shall not be acquirer of the Senate as required by law. Breckinridge having resigned his seat as President of the Senate, a President protem, is put in his place, and there being no legal election of President, the Senate declare the then occupant of the Chair to be the President of the United States for the next four years. This plan, it is said, requires only five Northern Senators to carry it into effect, and the name of the man who is to be elected President by this manœuvre has been mentioned to me. He would never consent to such a trick, nor would the people either of the North or South accept it. Therefore, I merely give it as a sample of the plots and intrigues now going on here. As I sit in the House gallery, the resolutions of the several States touching such action as
December 13th (search for this): article 9
Auction Sale of the slavers. Norfolk, Dec. 13. --The condemned slavers, Storm King" and "Triton, were sold at auction to-day. The first vessel sold for $3,500; the "Triton" brought $2,025.
Auction Sale of the slavers. Norfolk, Dec. 13. --The condemned slavers, Storm King" and "Triton, were sold at auction to-day. The first vessel sold for $3,500; the "Triton" brought $2,025.
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