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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans).

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Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
battle of Shiloh, the Third Alabama cavalry was organized, he was appointed its colonel. From that time until the close of the long war he was on constant and active duty in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, and the Carolinas, and during a large part of the last two years commanded a cavalry brigade under General Wheeler, consisting of the First, Third, Fourth, Ninth and Fifty-first Alabama regiments, and Twelfth battalion. He was wounded twice in Tennessee, once at Franklin, the next time at Kingston, and once in North Carolina, at Fayetteville. Though for some time commanding a brigade, he did not receive a brigadier-general's commission until a short while before the close of the war, in February, 1865. Being a man of generous nature and manly impulses, he was greatly admired and loved by his soldiers. He knew how to obey as well as command, and set before his men an example of the implicit obedience due by a subordinate to a superior officer. Since the war he has led a quiet, une
Lavergne (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
s attached to General Forrest's command, and, subsequently, was transferred to the command of General Wheeler, then chief of cavalry. Afterward it fought in Martin's division. It was in constant, active and arduous service, often far in front of the Confederate forces, on the flanks or in the rear of the enemy, or raiding the enemy's territory and destroying his supply trains. It was in daily conflict with the Federals, and the aggregate of its losses was large. It was in the fights at Lavergne, Shelbyville, Murfreesboro, Tracy City and Chickamauga, and in the famous raid in the Sequatchie valley, in which 1,000 wagons, loaded with stores, were burned, and 4,000 mules were butchered. With the brigade his work was of the same nature on a larger field and with greater responsibilities. With it he shared the hardships and the dangers of the campaigns around Knoxville, against Burnside, and in east Tennessee, and, subsequently, having been ordered from the French Broad to General Jo
Lebanon (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
was cut short by death on July 19, 1893. Brigadier-General George Doherty Johnston was born in 1832, at Hillsboro, N. C. His father was a merchant of that town and his mother was a Miss Bond, granddaughter of Maj. George Doherty, a colonial officer in 1776. His parents moved to Alabama and settled at Greensboro in 1833. That same year his father died and his mother moved to Marion, where he was reared, and educated at Howard college. He studied law and, being admitted to the bar at Lebanon, Tenn., opened an office at Marion in 1855. The following year he was mayor, and in 1857 he represented the county in the legislature. At the opening of the war he was a lieutenant in the Fourth Alabama and was with that command at Manassas and in its other service in Virginia until January, 1862, when he was commissioned major of the Twenty-fifth Alabama. On the fall of Colonel Loomis at Shiloh, April 6, 1862, he became lieutenant-colonel. From that day he was with his regiment in every e
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rank and file. In command of Clayton's brigade, he relieved Walthall's brigade on the evening of November 24th, on Lookout Mountain, and on the next day he took a gallant-part in the battle of Missionary Ridge. He was also with A. P. Stewart's div Springs, the battles around Atlanta and Jonesboro, wherever Stevenson's division was engaged. During the battle on Lookout Mountain he led the Twentieth, Thirty-first and Forty-sixth regiments to the relief of Moore and Walthall, and, said General in his general orders of November 27th: It was Pettus' brigade which first checked an enemy flushed with victory on Lookout Mountain, and held him at bay until ordered to retire. On the next day, on the right of Missionary Ridge, the whole divisione and vigilant. After his exchange he served with his regiment, the brigade under General Pettus, in the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, Rocky Face near Dalton, Resaca, New Hope church, Kenesaw, the various battles around Atlanta,
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ened dismemberment and appropriation of China by the European powers. He would give the United States an effective voice in diplomacy wherever, to the uttermost parts of the earth, an American right or an American interest is involved, and, if necessary, sup. port diplomacy even by arms. Because of his aggressive Americanism, no less than because of his learning and ability, President Harrison appointed him one of the two American members of the Bering sea arbitration tribunal that met in Paris in 1893. Brigadier-General Edward Asbury O'Neal was born in Madison county, Ala., in 1818. His father, Edward O'Neal, was a native of Ireland, and his mother was Miss Rebecca Wheat, a member of one of the Huguenot families of South Carolina. They moved to Alabama and settled in Madison county soon after their marriage. When Edward Asbury was but three months old his father died. His mother was a lady of much force of character and managed her affairs well, giving to both her boys, Bas
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
o General Forrest's command, and, subsequently, was transferred to the command of General Wheeler, then chief of cavalry. Afterward it fought in Martin's division. It was in constant, active and arduous service, often far in front of the Confederate forces, on the flanks or in the rear of the enemy, or raiding the enemy's territory and destroying his supply trains. It was in daily conflict with the Federals, and the aggregate of its losses was large. It was in the fights at Lavergne, Shelbyville, Murfreesboro, Tracy City and Chickamauga, and in the famous raid in the Sequatchie valley, in which 1,000 wagons, loaded with stores, were burned, and 4,000 mules were butchered. With the brigade his work was of the same nature on a larger field and with greater responsibilities. With it he shared the hardships and the dangers of the campaigns around Knoxville, against Burnside, and in east Tennessee, and, subsequently, having been ordered from the French Broad to General Johnston at D
Tracy City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d, and, subsequently, was transferred to the command of General Wheeler, then chief of cavalry. Afterward it fought in Martin's division. It was in constant, active and arduous service, often far in front of the Confederate forces, on the flanks or in the rear of the enemy, or raiding the enemy's territory and destroying his supply trains. It was in daily conflict with the Federals, and the aggregate of its losses was large. It was in the fights at Lavergne, Shelbyville, Murfreesboro, Tracy City and Chickamauga, and in the famous raid in the Sequatchie valley, in which 1,000 wagons, loaded with stores, were burned, and 4,000 mules were butchered. With the brigade his work was of the same nature on a larger field and with greater responsibilities. With it he shared the hardships and the dangers of the campaigns around Knoxville, against Burnside, and in east Tennessee, and, subsequently, having been ordered from the French Broad to General Johnston at Dalton, participated in the
Triune (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d the reorganization at Tupelo, he participated in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, in command of the Fourth brigade of Buckner's division, Hardee's corps, distinguished for valor at Perryville. Said General Hardee: Brigadier-General Wood was severely wounded by the fragment of a shell; his quartermaster, commissary, and adjutant-general were killed, and the three colonels next in rank, on whom the command successively devolved, were wounded. In the Murfreesboro campaign he was warmly engaged at Triune December 27th, far in front, checking the Federal advance. On the 31st he shared in the splendid record of Cleburne's division, routing the enemy, and on January 1st, sent forward to feel the enemy, he lost nearly 100 men. Cleburne acknowledged great indebtedness to the efficiency of General Wood in this great conflict. The brigade lost 400, out of 1,100 engaged. On June 29th he was in command, and repulsed the enemy at Liberty Gap, Tenn. In the battle of Chickamauga, his brigade was Low
Jacksboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nfantry. Proceeding to Virginia with his regiment, Captain Gracie was promoted to major of the Eleventh Alabama, July 12, 1861. Later he obtained authority to raise a regiment, which he did in the spring of 1862, and was elected colonel. This was the Forty-third Alabama, and was assigned to the corps led by Gen. Kirby Smith, operating in east Tennessee. Toward the latter part of August, 1862, Colonel Gracie was put in command of a brigade and led an expedition from Clinton northward to Jacksboro, and across the Cumberland mountains into Scott county, where he attacked Fort Cliff, defended by a body of Tennessee loyalists under Colonel Cliff. He captured the fort, whose defenders fled after making a slight show of resistance. He led his regiment through the Kentucky campaign, was commandant of the town of Lexington during its occupancy by the Confederates, and of Cumberland Gap after the return to Tennessee. In November, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general; his command c
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ch he led as colonel in the Kentucky campaign and in the sanguinary battle of Murfreesboro. In this lastnamed battle he was severely wounded, and immediately after he was promoted to brigadier-general. The brigade to which he was assigned at Tullahoma, in April, 1863, consisted of the Eighteenth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-eighth, Fifty-second and Fifty-eighth regiments. Clayton's brigade bore a conspicuous part at Chickamauga, in the fighting around Dalton, at New Hope church, and in all the batnied General Holmes in 1862 to the Trans-Mississippi department as chief of staff. Later he commanded a brigade of Texans in Churchill's division, which was captured at Arkansas Post in January, 1863. In June he was exchanged, and going to Tullahoma, Tenn., met the remnants of his division, which were thrown into one brigade. Deshler was on July 28th promoted to the rank of brigadier-general and placed in command of this brigade. As a part of Cleburne's division his brigade was hotly engaged
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