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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
ew Orleans, La., July, 1864, but not completed. New. Organized from 1st Kansas Colored Infantry December 13, 1864. Attached to 2nd Brigade, District of the Frontier, 7th Corps, Dept. of Arkansas, to January, 1865. Colored Brigade, 7th Corps, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Corps, to August, 1865. Dept. of Arkansas to October, 1865. Service. Duty at Fort Smith, Ark., till January, 1865. Skirmish at Ivey's Ford January 8. Ordered to Little Rock January 16. Skirmish at Clarksville, Ark., January 18. Duty at Little Rock, Ark., till July, and at Pine Bluff till October. Mustered out at Pine Bluff, Ark., October 1, 1865, and discharged at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, October 30, 1865. Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 183 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 165 Enlisted men by disease. Total 354. 80th United States Colored Regiment Infantry. Organized April 4, 1864, from 8th Corps de Afrique Infa
ven, Or those whom choice and common good ordains. Liberty, by James Thomson. Hear him, ye senates! Hear this truth sublime,-- He who allows oppression shares the crime. Botanic Garden, by Erasmus Darwin. By a famous coalition of the Free-soil and Democratic parties, effected mainly through the agency of Henry Wilson in the legislature, 1851, Mr. Sumner was elected, over Robert C. Winthrop, the Whig candidate, to the Senate of the United States. The contest, commencing on the 16th day of January, was long and acrimonious. Mr. Winthrop had much experience in public affairs, and was an intimate friend of Daniel Webster. Mr. Sumner would make no pledges: he had never held, nor did he desire to hold, any political office. Mr. Sumner said in a conversation with James Redpath, written at the time, that committee after committee waited on him during the election, to get even verbal promises relative to tariff, and to ease off on the slave question; but he uniformly declined to
onel Hallowell, with the remaining companies, was assigned to the steamer General Hunter. Gillmore's Florida expedition was afloat, for the troops comprising his force had embarked on some twenty-eight transports, in darkness. It was probable that our point of attack would be unknown. But General Beauregard was aware of some movement, and notified General Gilmer at Savannah to prepare, and had troops ready to move over the railroads to the southward. He personally visited Savannah on January 16, returning to Charleston February 3. General Seymour, assigned to command the expedition, was to have a force of about seven thousand men. His transports were ordered to rendezvous at the mouth of the St. John's River, Florida. Admiral Dahlgren was to co-operate, with some naval vessels. It was most enjoyable voyaging down the coast. A few men were seasick, but soon recovered. The Maple Leaf arrived off the St. John's at 8.50 A. M. on the 7th, and the General Hunter at 9 A. M. El
ediately to Headquarters, and placed on file. Governor Banks, to whom the report was addressed, retired from office four days after it was printed, and before any action could be taken upon the recommendations made. They looked to a greatly increased active militia force, and are the first suggestions that were made in an official form for strengthening the military force of the Commonwealth, and placing it upon a war footing. Governor Andrew adopted these suggestions; and on the 16th of January, eleven days after his inauguration, directed the Adjutant-General to issue General Order No. 4, which created a great interest throughout the State, and especially among the active militia. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. General order no. 4. Headquarters, Boston, Jan. 16, 1861. Events which have recently occurred, and are now in progress, require that Massachusetts should be at all times ready to furnish her quota upon any requisition of the President of the United States, to
ntless will, and a tireless capacity for work, are wanted. We take pleasure in presenting this letter to our readers, because it speaks only the plain and simple truth of a gentleman with whom we were associated on the staff of Governor Andrew, and also of that of his predecessor, Governor Banks, and whose acquaintance and friendship we greatly esteem. We believe that it was written without the knowledge of General Sargent, and that he is not now aware of its existence. On the 16th of January, Edward Everett, one of the most distinguished citizens of the nation, died in the city of Boston, after a short illness. The sudden death of this illustrious man, whose whole life had reflected honor upon his native State and his country, caused a profound sensation. His speeches during the war kept alive and invigorated the loyal spirit and purpose of the people. On the 17th of January, the Governor telegraphed to Senator Sumner as follows:— Should it be the purpose of the
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
ng to fulfil their promises made to God upon the eve of and during the late battles. We are expecting and praying for great things. The work of Rev. L. B. Payne in hospitals in Georgia for one month was 27 sermons, distributed 300 papers, 18,000 pages of tracts, and about 32,000 pages of reading matter in books, which he had procured by soliciting donations. Some have been awakened, others professed conversion. Rev. J. W. Turner, in and near Savannah, Georgia: He preached in January 16 sermons, travelled about 400 miles, distributed 177 books, conversed privately with several soldiers on religion, and prayed with 102 soldiers who professed to be seeking Christ. Rev. A. M. Thigpen labored in Colquitt's Brigade, near Charleston. In the Twenty-third Georgia, 60 conversions. The meeting was conducted in harmony by Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists. In a letter from General Johnston's army, Rev. J. J. Hutchinson describes a most pleasing scene. He says: Ten
oring to fulfill their promises made to God upon the eve of and during the late battles. We are expecting and praying for great things. The work of Rev. L. B. Payne in hospitals in Georgia for one month was 27 sermons, distributed 300 papers, 18,000 pages of tracts, and about 32,000 pages of reading matter in books, which he had procured by soliciting donations. Some have been awakened, others professed conversion. Rev. J. W. Turner, in and near Savannah, Ga.: He preached in January 16 sermons, travelled about 400 miles, distributed 177 books, conversed privately with several soldiers on religion, and prayed with 102 soldiers who professed to be seeking Christ. Rev. A. M. Thigpen labored in Colquitt's brigade near Charleston. In the 23d Georgia, 60 conversions. The meeting was conducted in harmony by Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists. Rev. Geo. W. Yarbrough reported from General Longstreet's army near Russellville, Tenn: At Petersburg I entered upon m
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
for the same. 1864. July 28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding eight thousand dollars, to be called a recruiting fund, and to be used to procure men to fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for more men, it having been reported that some of the men who had enlisted from Wilbraham had been credited to other towns. Porter Cross and Sumner Smith were chosen to investigate the matter at Boston, and have the rolls there corrected. 1865. January 16th, The treasurer was directed to borrow five thousand dollars as a recruiting fund to be used by the selectmen in procuring volunteers to the credit of the town. The following resolve was passed:— Resolved, That a vote of thanks be tendered to General B. F. Butler for his services in the United-States military department during the present civil war. Wilbraham furnished two hundred and twenty-three men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-six over and above all demands. Four
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ppointed a committee to have the charge and superintendence of recruiting volunteers, and determine the amount of bounty to be paid, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars to any one person; and the treasurer, under the direction of the finance committee, was authorized to borrow money to pay said bounties. The recruiting committee was authorized to employ a suitable person or persons to continue the correction and revision of the United-States enrollment-list of Charlestown. January 16th, A series of resolutions in memory of the death of Hon. Edward Everett was read by Alderman Kent, and adopted, of which we copy the following:— Resolved, That the City Council of Charlestown have learned with unfeigned sorrow of the death of Hon. Edward Everett, which took place at his residence in Boston, Sunday morning, January 15th, at five o'clock. Resolved, That in passing away even in the fullness of his years and crowned with distinguished honors, the State has lost one of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
at which four thousand five hundred dollars were appropriated to procure volunteers to fill the quota of West Roxbury under the recent call of the President for more men; also twelve thousand dollars to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the military service for three years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, to fill any future call that may be made by the President for men. 1865. At a meeting held on the 16th of January, the treasurer was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, which sum shall be assessed in the next annual assessment of taxes. It was also voted that Stephen M. Weld, Esq., be relieved from all liability under and by reason of a receipt given by him to the town-treasurer under date of Feb. 12, 1864, for the sum of two thousand dollars, the said sum having been paid over to him on account of expenses incurred by him in behalf of the recruiting committee of th
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