hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 512 results in 349 document sections:

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Breckenridge, John, 1760-1806 (search)
gusta county. Va., Dec. 2, 1760; was admitted to the bar in 1785; elected to Congress in 1793 but did not accept, having determined to remove to Kentucky, where he settled near Lexington. He was appointed attorney-general of Kentucky in 1795. In 1798 he met Jefferson and Nicholas at Monticello and prepared the famous Kentucky resolutions of 1798, of which Jefferson claimed the authorship. In 1801 he was elected to the United States Senate, and resigned in 1805 to become Attorney-General under accept, having determined to remove to Kentucky, where he settled near Lexington. He was appointed attorney-general of Kentucky in 1795. In 1798 he met Jefferson and Nicholas at Monticello and prepared the famous Kentucky resolutions of 1798, of which Jefferson claimed the authorship. In 1801 he was elected to the United States Senate, and resigned in 1805 to become Attorney-General under President Jefferson, which office he filled about four months. He died in Lexington, Ky., Dec. 14, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, Jacob, 1775-1828 (search)
Brown, Jacob, 1775-1828 Military officer; born in Bucks county, Pa., May 9, 1775, of Quaker parentage. He taught school at Crosswicks. N. J., for three years, and passed two Medal presented to General Brown by Congress. years in surveying lands in Ohio. In 1798 he opened a select school in the city of New York, and studied law. Some of his newspaper essays attracted the notice of General Brown's monument. Gen. Alexander Hamilton, to whom he became secretary while that officer was acting general-in-chief of the army raised to fight the French. On leaving that service he went to northern New York, purchased lands on the banks of the Black River, not many miles from Sackett's Harbor, and founded the flourishing settlement of Brownsville, where he erected the first building within 30 miles of Lake Ontario. There he became county judge; colonel of the militia in 1809; brigadier-general in 1810; and, in 1812, received the appointment of commander of the frontier from Oswego to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
. Burr was a born intriguer, and was naturally drawn towards Lee and Gates, and became a partisan in their schemes for injuring the reputation of Washington. He had been detected by the commander-in-chief in immoralities, and ever afterwards he affected to despise the military character of Washington. He began to practise law at Albany in 1782, but removed to New York the next year. Entering the arena of politics, he was chosen a member of the New York legislature in 1784, and again in 1798. In 1789 he was appointed adjutant-general of the State, and commissioner of revolutionary claims in 1791. A member of the United States Senate from 1791 till 1797, Burr was a conspicuous Democratic leader in that body; and in the Presidential election in 1800 he and Thomas Jefferson had an equal number of votes in the electoral college. The House of Representatives decided the choice in favor of Jefferson on the thirty-sixth ballot, and Burr became Vice-President. In July, 1804, he kille
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabell, William 1730-1798 (search)
Cabell, William 1730-1798 Statesman; born in Licking Hole, Va., March 13, 1730; was a commissioner to arrange military claims in 1758. During the trouble between the American colonies and Great Britain, prior to the Revolutionary War, he was a delegate to all the conventions for securing independence; was also a member of the committee which drew up the famous declaration of rights. On Jan. 7, 1789, he was one of the Presidential electors who voted for Washington as the first President of the United States. He died in Union Hill, March 23, 1798.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
olicitor of the treasury. He is further charged with the superintendence of all United States district attorneys and marshals, with the examination of all applications to the President for pardons, and with the transfer of all land purchased by the United States for government buildings, etc. The name, Department of justice, by which this division of the cabinet is now largely known, was given to it about 1872. The Navy Department (1789) was at first included in the War Department, but in 1798 the two branches of the service were separated. Aug. 21, 1842, this department was organized into five bureaus— Seal of the Department of justice. the bureau of navy-yards and docks; of construction, equipment, and repair; of provisions and clothing; of ordnance and hydrography; of medicine and surgery. To these have since been added a bureau Seal of the Navy Department. of navigation, one of steam engineering, and one of recruiting, to which last has been added the work of equipment f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabot, George 1751-1823 (search)
Cabot, George 1751-1823 Statesman; born in Salem, Mass., Dec. 3, 1751; educated at Harvard College; member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress; also of the State convention which accepted the national Constitution; was a United States Senator in 1791-96; and became the first Secretary of the Navy in 1798. He died in Boston, Mass., April 18, 1823.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carleton, Thomas 1736-1817 (search)
Carleton, Thomas 1736-1817 Military officer; born in England in 1736; joined the British army and came to America in 1755 as an ensign in Wolfe's command; was promoted lieutenant-general in 1798, and general in 1803. During the Revolutionary War he received a wound in the naval battle with Arnold on Lake Champlain in 1776. He died in Ramsgate, England, Feb. 2, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Champe, John 1752-1798 (search)
Champe, John 1752-1798 Patriot; born in Loudon county, Va., in 1752; sent to New York as a spy after the treason of Arnold, at the request of Washington. As it was also rumored that another American officer (supposed to be General Gates) was a traitor, Champ was instructed to discover the second traitor, and, if possible, to take Arnold. He left the American camp at Tappan at night, in the character of a deserter, was pursued, but reached Paulus Hook, where the British vessels were anch garden every night, and conceived a plan for his capture. With a comrade he was to seize and gag him, and convey him as a drunken soldier to a boat in waiting, which would immediately cross to the New Jersey shore, where a number of horsemen were to be in waiting. Unfortunately, on the night set, Arnold changed his quarters, and the command of which Champe was a member was ordered to Virginia. Later he escaped and joined the army of Greene in North Carolina. He died in Kentucky, about 1798.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Channing, William Ellery 1780-1842 (search)
Channing, William Ellery 1780-1842 Clergyman; born in Newport, R. I., April 7, 1780; graduated at Harvard in 1798 with highest honors; was a teacher in a private family in Richmond, Va., for a year afterwards; and, returning in feeble health in 1802, studied theology, and became pastor of the Federal Street Church in Boston, June 1, 1803. All through his laborious life he suffered from ill-health. In 1822 he sought physical improvement by a voyage to Europe, and in 1830 he went to St. Croix, William Ellery Channing W. I., for the same purpose. With a colleague he occasionally officiated in the pulpit until 1840, when he resigned. In August, 1842, he delivered his last public address at Lenox, Mass., in commemoration of the abolition of slavery in the West Indies. Mr. Channing contributed much towards stimulating anti-slavery feeling. He died in Bennington, Vt., Oct. 2, 1842.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chauncey, Isaac (search)
Chauncey, Isaac Naval officer; born Isaac Chauncey. in Black Rock, Conn., Feb: 20, 1772; in early life was in the merchant service, Chauncey's monument. and commanded a ship at the age of nineteen years. He made several voyages to the East Indies in the ships of John Jacob Astor. In 1798 he was made a lieutenant of the navy, and was acting captain of the Chesapeake in 1802. He became master in May, 1804, and captain in 1806. During the War of 1812-15 he was in command of the American naval force on Lake Ontario, where he performed efficient service. After that war he commanded the Mediterranean squadron, and, with Consul Shaler, negotiated a treaty with Algiers. In 1820 he was naval commissioner in Washington, D. C., and again from 1833 until his death, in that city, Jan. 27, 1840. Commodore Chauncey's remains were interred in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, and at the head of his grave stands a fine white-marble monument, suitably inscribed.
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...