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P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 2 (search)
PARMENO Smartly said; really they ought to be wonderful things to please the Captain. But I see my master's youngest son coming this way; I wonder why he has come away from the Piraeus,From the Piroeus)--Ver. 290. The Piraeus was the chief harbor of Athens, at the mouth of the Cephisus, about three miles from the City. It was joinedPiraeus was the chief harbor of Athens, at the mouth of the Cephisus, about three miles from the City. It was joined to the town by two walls, one of which was built by Themistocles, and the other by Pericles. It was the duty of the Athenian youth to watch here in turn by way of precaution against surprise by pirates or the enemy. for he is at present on guard there in the public service. It's not for nothing; he's coming in a hurry, too; I can't imagine why
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 3 (search)
this as an instance of the art of Terence, in preserving the probability of Chaerea's being received for the Eunuch. He shows hereby that he is so entirely a stranger to the family that he does not even know the person of Thais. It is also added that she has not been long in the neighborhood, and he lias been on duty at the Piraeus. The meaning of his regret is, that, not knowing Thais, he will not have an opportunity of seeing the girl. PARMENO Quite. CHAEREA But nothing in comparison with this damsel of mine? PARMENO Another thing altogether. CHAEREA Troth now, Parmeno, prithee do contrive for me to gain possession of her.
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 4 (search)
Enter ANTIPHO. ANTIPHO to himself. Yesterday some young fellows of us agreed together at the Piraeus that we were to go shares today in a club-entertainment. We gave Chaerea charge of this matter; our rings were givenOur rings were given: It was the custom of parties who agreed to join in a "symbola," or "club" or "picnic" entertainment, to give their rings as pledges to the "rex convivii," or "getter up the feast." Stakes were also deposited on making bets at races. See Ovid's Art of Love, B. i., l. 168. as pledges; the place and time arranged. The time has now gone by; at the place appointed there was nothing ready. The
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Hecyra: The Mother-In-Law (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 4 (search)
master? PAMPHILUS Yes, and waiting for you. PARMENO What's the matter? PAMPHILUS You must run across to the citadel.To the citadel: This was the fort or citadel that defended the Piraeus, and being three miles distant from the city, was better suited for the design of Pamphilus, whose object it was to keep Parmeno for some time at a distance. PARMENO Who must? PAMPHILUS You.
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