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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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introduced into this discussion. By a principle essential to Christianity, says Coleridge, a person is eternally differenced from a thing; so that the idea of a Human Being necessarily excludes the idea of property in that Being. With regret, though not with astonishment, I learn that a Boston divine has sought to throw the seamless garment of Christ over this shocking wrong. But I am patient, and see clearly how vain will be his effort, when I call to mind, that, within this very century, other divines sought to throw the same seamless garment over the more shocking slave-trade; and that, among many publications, a little book was then put forth with the name of a reverend clergyman on the title-page, to prove that the African trade for negro slaves is consistent with the principles of humanity and revealed religion; and, thinking of these things, I am ready to say with Shakespeare, In religion, What damned error, but some sober brow Will bless it and approve it with a text?
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Preface (search)
literature there was, by the middle of the last century, a wholesome reaction represented in Rufus Wilmot Griswold's introduction to his Prose writers of America (1847). Since this old demand is still reasserted from year to year, it may not be amiss to reprint here Griswold's admirable reply to it. Some critics in England, he says, expect us who write the same language, profess the same religion, and have in our intellectual firmament the same Bacon, Sidney, and Locke, the same Spenser, Shakespeare, and Milton, to differ more from themselves than they differ from the Greeks and Romans, or from any of the modems. This would be harmless, but that many persons in this country, whose thinking is done abroad, are constantly echoing it, and wasting their little productive energy in efforts to comply with the demand. But there never was and never can be an exclusively national literature. All nations are indebted to each other and to preceding ages for the means of advancement; and our
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
milar output of his age. A number, and by no means the least rhythmical, were inspired by his associates on the western shores of the Atlantic. One of these is addressed To the right Honourable, Sir George Calvert, Knight, Baron of Baltimore, and Lord of Avalon in Britaniola, who came over to see his Land there, 1627 ; it compares Baltimore to the Queen of Sheba. The repayment of the drafts made upon the literature of the motherland was not long delayed. It is more than probable that Shakespeare found in the reports of some New World voyagers one of his most momentous inspirations. Hugh Peters and the younger Harry Vane were only two of the temporary Americans who returned to take a lively part in the pamphleteering conflicts of the Protectorate. Roger Williams divided his controversial activities equally between the old and New England, and his Key into the languages of America was cast into shape while he was on his way from one to the other. Robert Sedgwick, one of the wo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
Passy and enjoyed the distinction of suffering from the gout. With affluence and years he acquired a palate, and gave a little play to the long repressed tastes of an Epicurean whom early destiny had cast upon a rock-bound coast. The literary expression of his autumnal festivity is to be found in the bagatelles. The Ephemera proves that this great eighteenth-century rationalist had a fancy. It is no relative, indeed, of that romantic spirit which pipes to the whistling winds on the enchanted greens of Shakespeare. It is rather the classic Muse of eighteenth-century art which summons the rosy Loves and Desires to sport among the courtiers and philosophers and the wasp-waisted ladies in a fete champetre or an Embarkment for Cythera of Watteau. The tallow chandler's son who enters on the cycle of his development by cultivating thrift with Defoe, continues it by cultivating tolerance and philanthropy with Voltaire, and completes it with Lord Chesterfield by cultivating the graces.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
ibrary had no copies of Addison or Steele at this period. Swift, Pope, Prior, and Dryden would also have been looked for in vain. Milton himself was little known in the stronghold of Puritanism. But the printing office of James Franklin had Shakespeare, Milton, Addison, Steele, Cowley, Butler's Hudibras, and The Tail of the Tub The spelling of the Courant. on its shelves. All these were read and used in the editor's office, but The Spectator and its kind became the actual model for the gainst the French enemy. The expression of the sentiment, even thus early, seems national. This whole series, though somewhat florid in style, shows the familiarity of the cultivated Southerner with his favourite English poets,--Young, Pope, Shakespeare. Livingston's well-known Watch-Tower, Appearing in Gaine's Mercury in 1754-1755. a continuation of his pamphlet-magazine The independent Reflector, has already the keen edge of the Revolutionary writings of fifteen and twenty years later.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
ession in a changing temporal order: Don Juan is, perhaps, implied in the English Bards and Childe Harold, paradise lost in the Nativity, Hamlet in Romeo and Juliet; but, in a humbler sphere, Among the trees and The flood of years are less implied than actually present in A Forest Hymn and Thanatopsis. If Bryant's poems need sometimes the reference of date, it is for external occasion and impulse, not for artistic registration. Three periods have been discovered for Chaucer, and four for Shakespeare; our modest American was without periods. The critical problem is simple, though not necessarily trivial or easy, in another way: this one performance was itself of a relatively simple character. Bryant's poems stress perpetually a certain few ideas, grow perpetually out of a certain few emotional responses, and report in a few noble imaginative modes a certain few aspects of man and nature, with ever recurring habits of observation, architectonics, and style. This absence of complex
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
mitted to the bar the next year, published the first of his many volumes of verse, and suffered the death of his young wife. Thence, in 1832, he set out to the North on a career of authorship in which necessity confirmed his training and temper by urging him to immense industry and careless work. It is unnecessary to say more of the miscellaneous tasks of Simms than that he wrote moderate poetry to the end of his life, including three tragedies, that he edited the apocryphal plays of Shakespeare, that he produced popular histories of South Carolina and popular biographies of Marion, Captain John Smith, the Chevalier Layard, and General Greene, and that he kept up a ceaseless flood of contributions to periodicals. His range of interest and information was large, but he commonly dealt with American, and particularly Southern, affairs. His really significant work, as a romancer, he began in 1833 with a Godwinian tale of crime, Martin Faber, which was so well received that he follo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
75 Seasons, 163 Secret journals, 144 n. Sedgwick, Miss C. M., 308, 310, 324 Sedgwick, Robert, 4 Seilhammer, G. O., 223 n. Select Charters, 125 n., 130 n., 134 n., 135 n., 141 n. Selected prose (N. P. Willis), 243 n. Self, 230 Self-Reliance, 336, 352 Sella, 263 n., 273, 281 Seneca, 116 Seneca Lake, 279 Sentiments of a British American, 127 Sertorius, the Roman patriot, 224 Seventy-six, 309 Sewall, Samuel, 48, 54 Shaftesbury, 93, 102, 109, I16 Shakespeare, 4, 12, 110, 112, 118, 211, 265 Sharpe, Colonel, 224 She would be a soldier, 220, 226 Shelburne, Lord, 91 Shelley, 261, 268, 274, 279, 290, 326, 346 Shenstone, 176, 178, 178 n. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 153 Sheppard Lee, 311 Sherman, Roger, 148 Sherman, General W. T., 317 Shipley, Bishop, 91 Shippen, Joseph, 122 Shirley, Governor, 106 Sidney, Algernon, 105, i18 Sievers, 275 Sigismund of Transylvania, 18 Sigurd the Volsung, 261 Silence Dogood, 94, 1
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
e labor and free labor, did not dare to compare New York with Virginia,--sister States, under the same government, planted by the same race, worshipping at the same altar, speaking the same language,--identical in all respects, save that one in which he wished to seek the contrast; but no; he compared it with Cuba,--[cheers and laughter,]--the contrast was so close! [Renewed cheers.] Catholic — Protestant; Spanish--Saxon; despotism — municipal institutions; readers of Lope de Vega and of Shakespeare; mutterers of the Masschildren of the Bible! But Virginia is too near home! So is Garrison! One would have thought there was something in the human breast which would sometimes break through policy. These noble-hearted men whom I have named must surely have found quite irksome the constant practice of what Dr. Gardiner used to call that despicable virtue, prudence ! [Laughter.] One would have thought, when they heard that name spoken with contempt, their ready eloquence would have lea
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
sham. The upper tier of letters is mere amateur; does not understand its own business. William H. Prescott would have washed his hand twice, had Walker the filibuster grasped it unwittingly; but he sits down in his study and writes the history of filibusters, respectable only because they died three hundred years ago He did not know that he was the mere annalist of the Walkers and Jefferson Davises of that age. [Applause.] [In this connection, Mr. Phillips referred to Bunyan and to Shakespeare, by way of illustrating his point that the literature which is of use is the literature that is not honored as such when it is written.] So it is with government. Government arrogates to itself that it alone forms men. As well might the man down here in the court-house, who registers the birth of children, imagine that he was the father of all the children he registers. [Loud laughter.] Everybody knows that government never began anything. It is the whole world that thinks and gover
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