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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 1 1 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 1 1 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
Dana, and Messrs. Warren, McLean, Darrow, Park, and Braman of the council, were appointed a committee to have charge of all matters relating to recruiting for the land and naval forces of the United States during the current year, the payment of bounties, and the revision of the enrollment lists in the several wards under the supervision of his honor the mayor. A joint committee was also appointed to provide suitably for returning regiments passing through Boston, the same as last year. January 16th, Mayor Lincoln communicated in an eloquent message to the city council the death of the Hon. Edward Everett, and resolutions of respect and condolence were unanimously adopted. April 17th, The mayor communicated in a written message to the aldermen the assassination of President Lincoln, and the attempt to take the life of Secretary Seward. A series of appropriate resolutions were read and adopted, after which on motion of Alderman Dana the board adjourned. The foregoing is a brief b
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
Sept. 14, ‘63. Anderson, Chas., priv., (B), Jan. 16, ‘65; 28; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Anderson, Johnck on M. O. of Co. Brown, George, priv., (B), Jan. 16, ‘65; 33; deserted June 18, ‘65. Brown, Geo. M. O. June 30, ‘65. Daley, Wm., priv., (B), Jan. 16, ‘65; 24; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Danne, Redfordl, priv., (F), Aug. 6, ‘61; 34; disch. disa. Jan. 16, ‘63. Graham, Edmund, priv., (—),July 31, ‘61, ‘65; N. F.R. Green, Daniel J., priv., (B), Jan. 16, ‘65; 28; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Green, Frankliatrick, priv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 19; disch. Jan. 16, ‘62 as corp. to enlist in 5th U. S. Art'y., c. 13, ‘61 as Corp. Lutz, George, priv., (H), Jan. 16, ‘65; 23; deserted Apr. 9, ‘65. Lyford, John61; 21; N. F.R. Maloney, William, priv., (C), Jan. 16, ‘65; 23; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Mann, John, pr, Jan 14, ‘63. O'Connor, Robert, priv., (—), Jan. 16. ‘65; disch. May 6, ‘65; unassigned. O'Conn, (G), May 13, ‘64; 23; sub. J. H. Hunt; died Jan. 16
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 1: from Massachusetts to Virginia. (search)
days after the Rebel batteries had opened upon the Federal garrison in Fort Sumter, a telegram from Washington to Governor Andrew of Massachusetts, to send forward fifteen hundred men, was followed later in the day by a formal requisition for two full regiments of militia, there had been no thought or preparation for the service of other troops to sustain the General Government in the great Rebellion. Governor Andrew had taken steps to prepare the militia as early in the year as the sixteenth of January, in his Order No. 4, in which all the members who were willing to respond to the orders of the Commanderin-Chief when issued, in response to a requisition from the President of the United States to aid in the maintenance of the laws and the peace of the Union, were directed to signify it; those refusing, were to be discharged and their places filled by men ready for any public exigency which may arise. On the fourth of February, 1861, the general officers of State militia, with a f
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
ent of a committee to inquire whether the Tribune's charges did not amount to an allegation of fraud against the members, and to report whether they were false or true. Turner charged the editor-member-whom he alluded to as perhaps the gentleman, or rather the individual, perhaps the thing --with seeking notoriety, and being engaged in a very small business. Greeley took part in the ensuing debate, holding tenaciously to the main point of his disclosure. The discussion continued until January 16, when the committee made a report exonerating the members, and there the matter practically dropped. Greeley was accused, during the discussion, of employing in his newspaper correspondence time that he should have devoted to the public business in the House, and a fierce and somewhat embarrassing attack was made on him concerning a vote which he gave on an appropriation for the purchase of certain books-archives, debates, etc.-with which it was customary to supply members. He certainly
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 7: Greeley's part in the antislavery contest (search)
istent with, and fatal to, the preservation of perfect freedom for any. Greeley's greatest effort in behalf of a presidential candidate was made for Clay, whose name he had kept at the head of his editorial page throughout 1843, and for whose election he labored the next year as he never labored again. Clay's status as a slave-owner was the subject of attacks (which the Tribune called a foul conspiracy ) by the Democrats and the Liberty men, both before and after his nomination, and on January 16, 1843, the Tribune stated its own view of the matter thus: Let no one pervert our position. We do not say the citizens of the free States have no means, no power, no right to act adversely upon slavery. They have means and powers which existed antecedently to the Constitution, and were not affected by it. The right to speak and write and labor, as men, against any moral wrong, is anterior (might we not say superior) to all government . . . We can excuse the thoroughgoing Abolition
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
m—no welcome to cheer him. The dismal lot of the Roman exile shall be his. He shall be a wanderer, without roof, fire, or water. Xvii. The contest which resulted in the election of Mr. Sumner to the United States Senate the first time, by the Legislature of Massachusetts, in 1851, was one of the most protracted and memorable in the history of any State. Mr. Boutwell, who is now the colleague of Mr. Sumner in the United States Senate, was then Governor of Massachusetts. On the 16th of January, on motion of Mr. Barry, a member of the House, the election of a United States Senator was taken up, and the contest lasted three months. The Daily Evening Transcript for that year gave the following history of the great contest: The first ballot resulted as follows: Whole number394 Necessary to a choice98 Charles Sumner80 Robert C. Winthrop66 A second ballot failed to elect either candidate, and the matter was postponed for one week. On January 23d, the election came up
Xvii. The contest which resulted in the election of Mr. Sumner to the United States Senate the first time, by the Legislature of Massachusetts, in 1851, was one of the most protracted and memorable in the history of any State. Mr. Boutwell, who is now the colleague of Mr. Sumner in the United States Senate, was then Governor of Massachusetts. On the 16th of January, on motion of Mr. Barry, a member of the House, the election of a United States Senator was taken up, and the contest lasted three months. The Daily Evening Transcript for that year gave the following history of the great contest: The first ballot resulted as follows: Whole number394 Necessary to a choice98 Charles Sumner80 Robert C. Winthrop66 A second ballot failed to elect either candidate, and the matter was postponed for one week. On January 23d, the election came up again by assignment, and resulted in the same manner, Mr. Sumner receiving 187 votes, 192 being necessary to a choice. On the 26
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Mrs. Lucy Osgood. Wayland, January 16,--1859. I have buckled to Buckle's History of civilization, though I said I would not read it because I dreaded being made uncomfortable by the point of view from which he looks at things. This making moral progress depend entirely on intellectual progress seems to turn things so inside out that it twists my poor brain. I care more that the world should grow better, than it should grow wiser. The external must be developed from the internal. It makes my head ache to look at human growth from any other point of view. That is the great mistake of Fourier. He is wise and great, and often prophetic, but he thinks to produce perfect men by surrounding them with perfect circumstances; whereas the perfect circumstances must be the result of perfect men. How can the marriage relation, for instance, be well ordered, until men and women are more pure? I have no sympathy with the doctrine that The body, not the soul, Governs the unfettered
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
and also published independently. 1857 (Worcester) Speech. (In State Disunion Convention, Worcester, Jan 15. Proceedings.) Pph. and Broadside. Speech at Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Massachusetts AntiSlav-ery Society. (In Liberator, Jan. 16, and a Broadside.) Statement on Spiritual Manifestations, April 15. Broadside. The New Revolution: A Speech before the American Anti-Slavery Society, May 12. Pph. Circular Letter, July 8, calling for State Disunion Convention. Leaflee Lowell Institute, Boston, 1903. They were reported in part in the Boston Evening Transcript under the following titles and dates: American Literature, Jan. 6; The Philadelphia Period, Jan. 9; Irving and Cooper, Jan. 13; Boston Takes the Lead, Jan. 16; Concord Litterateurs, Jan. 20; Influence of the South, Jan. 23; Writers from the West, Jan. 27; Our Literary Obstacles, Jan. 30. Personality of Emerson. (In Outlook, May 23.) Address. (In Centenary of the Birth of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Co
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. (search)
resident of the United States Hon. Schuyler Colfax, Speaker of the House of Representatives Hons. J. H. Lane, James Dixon, Charles Sumner, H. B. Anthony, Henry Wilson, John Sherman, A. C. Wilder, Thaddeus Stevens, Henry C. Deming, William D. Kelley. Robert C. Schenck, J. A. Garfield, and others: Gentlemen,--I thank you sincerely for the great and most unexpected honor which you have conferred upon me by your kind invitation to speak in Washington. Accepting it, I would suggest the 16th of January, as the time; desiring the proceeds to be devoted to the help of the suffering freedmen. Truly yours, Anna E. Dickinson. 1710 Locust St., Philadelphia, Jan. 7, 1864. The House of Representatives, by a remarkably large vote, have tendered Miss Dickinson the use of their hall for the occasion. Admission to the floor of the House, $1 00; to the galleries, 50 cents. Tickets for sale at the principal hotels and bookstores. Miss Anna Dickinson's lecture in Washington. [from t
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