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February 16th (search for this): chapter 15
he partially iron-clad St. Louis (flag steamer, Lieut. Paulding), Louisville (Commander Dove), and Pittsburg (Lieut. Egbt. Thompson); also the wooden gun-boats Conestoga (Lieut. Phelps), and Taylor (Lieut. Gwin), and several transports with re-enforcements for General Grant of 8,000 men. About midnight Captain Walke reported in person to the flag-officer. After the battle of Fort Donelson. Three gun boats remained until after the surrender of Fort Donelson, which took place on Sunday, February 16th, when they steamed up the river above the fort to Dover. There our officers and men met in good cheer. Our usual divine service was then performed on board the Carondelet. as the most appropriate way of giving thanks to God, the only Giver of victory, and under such circumstances it makes a very happy impression on all sincere hearts. The Carondelet had had two 32 or 42-pounder shot in her bow between wind and water, and leaked badly; her hull and her crew being more cut up and
February 13th (search for this): chapter 15
n of Dover. The fort was stronger, both in natural position and artificial defenses, than Fort Henry, and a land attack was more difficult, as there were heights above, below, and all around the works. The Carondelet had the honor of commencing the attack on Fort Donelson; having arrived before the fort two days in advance of the other gun-boats, she fired upon the enemy's works on the morning of February 12th; and also, at the request of General Grant, made a diversion in his favor on February 13th, as narrated in the following report of Commander Walke to Admiral Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Near Fort Donelson, Cumberland River, Feb. 15th. Sir:--I arrived here (towed by the Alps) on the 12th instant, about 11:20 A. M., and seeing or hearing nothing of our Army, I threw a few shell into Fort Donelson, to announce my arrival to General Grant, as he had previously requested. I then dropped down the river a few miles, and anchored for the night, awaiting General Grant's
essee at once fell into the hands of the national forces — the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers were opened to national vessels for hundreds of miles. Nashville, the capital of Tennessee and a place of great strategic importance, fell. Bowling Green had become untenable as soon as Donelson was attacked, and was abandoned on the 14th of February, the day before the Confederate works on the Cumberland were carried, while Columbus and the other end of the strategic line were evacuated early in March, thus leaving the Mississippi river free from the Confederate flag from St. Louis to Arkansas. The news of this victory was very encouraging to the Union people, especially when they beheld its results. When city after city fell and stronghold after stronghold was abandoned, and they saw that it was all in consequence of the capture of Fort Donelson, it is not strange that the national amazement and gratification knew no bounds, and it is only to be regretted that the Navy should not hav
February 14th (search for this): chapter 15
f that great military feat, in which he showed his fitness to lead the armies of the Union. The results of this victory were that the whole of Kentucky and Tennessee at once fell into the hands of the national forces — the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers were opened to national vessels for hundreds of miles. Nashville, the capital of Tennessee and a place of great strategic importance, fell. Bowling Green had become untenable as soon as Donelson was attacked, and was abandoned on the 14th of February, the day before the Confederate works on the Cumberland were carried, while Columbus and the other end of the strategic line were evacuated early in March, thus leaving the Mississippi river free from the Confederate flag from St. Louis to Arkansas. The news of this victory was very encouraging to the Union people, especially when they beheld its results. When city after city fell and stronghold after stronghold was abandoned, and they saw that it was all in consequence of the captu
February 11th (search for this): chapter 15
ers of Commander Walke, there was no explanation asked for, or made, when they met on the night of the 13th. The flag-officer, however, seemed to be satisfied when Commander Walke. informed him that the Carondelet would be ready for battle again as soon as she had replenished her ammunition,early on the following morning. We may, however, be assured by the remarks in Pollard's Southern History of the War, that if four or five steamers, instead of one, had menaced Fort Donelson on the 11th of February, a day or two before the enemy's re-enforcements had arrived, the effect would have been much more discouraging to the enemy. General Grant, being under the impression at least that Foote's flotilla could not assist him immediately, instructed Commander Walke to proceed without delay to commence the attack on Fort Donelson in connection with our Army before the enemy could receive re-enforcements or could strengthen his position. The following is the letter referred to, preceding th
February 12th (search for this): chapter 15
an attack on Fort Donelson, situated on the west bank of the Cumberland river, near the town of Dover. The fort was stronger, both in natural position and artificial defenses, than Fort Henry, and a land attack was more difficult, as there were heights above, below, and all around the works. The Carondelet had the honor of commencing the attack on Fort Donelson; having arrived before the fort two days in advance of the other gun-boats, she fired upon the enemy's works on the morning of February 12th; and also, at the request of General Grant, made a diversion in his favor on February 13th, as narrated in the following report of Commander Walke to Admiral Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Near Fort Donelson, Cumberland River, Feb. 15th. Sir:--I arrived here (towed by the Alps) on the 12th instant, about 11:20 A. M., and seeing or hearing nothing of our Army, I threw a few shell into Fort Donelson, to announce my arrival to General Grant, as he had previously requested. I th
February 7th (search for this): chapter 15
telegraphed to Gen. Halleck: Fort Henry is ours; the gunboats silenced the batteries before the investment was completed. I shall take and destroy Fort Donelson on the 8th. and return to Fort Henry. The same reasons which had induced Grant to undertake the capture of Fort Henry still urged him to take Fort Donelson; that is, to get the control of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and be able to penetrate into the heart of Tennessee with his troops and Foote's gun-boats. On the 7th of February his cavalry penetrated to within a mile of Fort Donelson, but they could obtain no information as to the strength of the place or the number of troops. Foote was notified of Grant's intentions, and was requested to have what gun-boats he could muster ready to attack the batteries before the army made its assault. But the great rise in the Tennessee River prevented Grant from completing his proposed movement. The water overflowed the river banks, and gave the army as much as it coul
February 8th (search for this): chapter 15
they proceeded up the river, doing good work in breaking up railroads and destroying camp equipage wherever they could find it. At a place called Cerro Gordo, they came across the steamer Eastport, which was being converted into a gunboat — a strong, powerful vessel, afterwards used as a gun-boat and ram by the Federal Government. She had been abandoned and scuttled, and her suction-pipes broken, but the leaks were stopped, and the vessel raised and taken back to Fort Henry. On the 8th of February the flotilla arrived at Chickasaw, near the state line, and seized two steamers. They then proceeded up to Florence, Alabama, near the mussel shoals, where three steamers had been set on fire by the Confederates. A force was landed and a large amount of stores, marked Fort Henry, were saved from the burning vessels; also a quantity that had been landed and stored. The results of this expedition were three steamers and one gun-boat seized, six steamers burned by the enemy to prevent
February 28th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 15
r fifteen guns of much less range, than the firing of four such gun-boats with less experienced crews, upon these batteries at close quarters for one hour and a half, at various distances, and much less deliberation? In reference to the reconnoissance and the bombardment on the following day, Captain Morgan made the same statement to the officers on board the Carondelet on Sunday, the morning of the surrender. Newspaper correspondents on the action. The Missouri Republican of February 28th, 1862, has this report in its correspondence of the day before the battle: During the day much uneasiness was felt as to the gun-boat fleet. It was therefore with no little gratification that information was at last received about noon on Thursday, that the avant courier of the fleet, the Carondelet, Commander Walke, had arrived below the fort. In the afternoon the report of her guns was received with cheer upon cheer by the troops encircling the beleaguered fort. Commander Walke
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