hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 901 143 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 874 6 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 810 42 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 588 6 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 529 95 Browse Search
James Longstreet 468 2 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 465 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 428 0 Browse Search
J. R. Trimble 377 3 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 310 68 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 7,081 total hits in 666 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Sandtown (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
cupation of Atlanta. October 4.--The brigade moved over to the north side of the city, and took position in the rebel earthworks from the Marietta road to the Sandtown road. October 11.--Accompanied a forage expedition under command of Brigadier-General Geary, in conjunction with a brigade from Second division; marched to Flntic and Western Railroad, and encamped near the large post on the Marietta road. October 9.--Moved about two miles further to the left, and encamped near the Sandtown road. October 11.--Marched off on Decatur road, in a south-easterly direction; afterward struck off to right, on road to Flat Rock, halting at eight P. M., nehe command encamped along the line of the enemy's works south-west of the city of Atlanta, and between the Sandtown and McDonough roads, the right resting on the Sandtown road and the left at the large fort about a half-mile from the McDonough road, and covered this front during the entire occupation of the city by our forces.
Eatonton (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
eight miles. November twentieth, moved toward Eatonton this morning at nine A. M., and encamped about five miles from Eatonton, after marching ten miles. This days's march was a very severe one, owingd. November twenty-second, marched through Eatonton, crossed Little River on pontoons, and campedery hard during the forenoon. Passed through Eatonton about eleven (11) A. M. Camped for the night miles south to Little River, passing through Eatonton. November 22.--Marched twelve miles to Milson, and marched in a southward course on the Eatonton road. At twelve M., it encamped three miles M., my command marched through the village of Eatonton. At nine P. M., the column having been tedioction, passing about six miles to the left of Eatonton. 22d. Marched at six A. M., the regiment g the railroad at Madison and passing through Eatonton, a point at the terminus of a branch of the rn-train, and camped about two miles north of Eatonton, at dark. 21st. Marched at five A. M., an[36 more...]
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
nth, the pickets of the corps were attacked by the enemy's cavalry, and my brigade was ordered to the breastworks on the Marietta road as a support to the Second brigade of this division, which had gone out on a reconnoissance. While here, one of October 4.--The brigade moved over to the north side of the city, and took position in the rebel earthworks from the Marietta road to the Sandtown road. October 11.--Accompanied a forage expedition under command of Brigadier-General Geary, in remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on the Marietta road; the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiment on the right of the brigade. Very large details of from eighty to one hundrRegiment moved about two miles to the left of the Atlantic and Western Railroad, and encamped near the large post on the Marietta road. October 9.--Moved about two miles further to the left, and encamped near the Sandtown road. October 11.--Mar
Gordon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
, four miles from Madison. November twentieth, marched at six A. M., Third division in advance, Second brigade in rear of division. Deployed in the trains. Encamped two (2) miles north of Eatonton at dark, having marched fourteen (14) miles. November twenty-first, moved at five A. M. A heavy rain falling, seriously affecting the roads. Third division in advance, Second brigade in advance of division. Eatonton is the terminus of a branch railroad intersecting the Central Railroad at Gordon, and miles distant from the latter place. Encamped at three P. M. on the Little River, ten miles from Milledgeville. November twenty-second. Here the brigade was detained by the crossing of the trains on the pontoon until four P. M., when it moved forward on Milledgeville road, Third division in rear, Second brigade in rear of division deployed on trains. The march was continued through the night, with frequent detentions on account of the trains, the advance regiment of the brigade re
Jonesborough (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
ttled, broken, piney country. My column crossed Beaver Run at eleven A. M., and at a quarter past twelve P. M. crossed Town Creek. At three P. M., my brigade crossed Geem Creek, and at half-past 4 P. M. encamped on the ridge beyond. The distance mcompletely blockaded with trains, I did not get my column fairly in motion until ten o'clock. Just before dark, crossed Town Creek, the bridge over which was very bad, and went into camp near Gum Creek; the First division being encamped about three qf a mile of the track. 24th. Started at seven A. M. Marched about ten (10) miles, and bivouacked at six P. M., near Town Creek. 25th. Started at half-past 6 A. M. Marched about six (6) miles, and bivouacked at nine P. M., just beyond Buffalo Railroad, which was successfully accomplished. Reached camp at five P. M. 24th. Broke camp at seven A. M., crossed Town Creek, and encamped for the night near Gum Creek, having marched twelve miles. 25th. Moved at nine A. M., passed through
Blue Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
cial Circle at nine A. M., and encamped near Madison at six P. M. Day's travel, fifteen miles. 19th. Marched at five A. M., division being detached from main column; passed through Madison, and along the Augusta Railroad, and bivouacked at Blue Springs, near the Oconee River, at four P. M. Detachment destroyed the bridge over the Oconee River, and the balance of the command destroyed the railroad in the vicinity. Day's travel, fifteen miles. 20th. Marched at seven A. M., and reached thek up the line of march before the break of day, passed through the town of Madison, halted for dinner at Buckhead Station. The division having separated from the corps and train, taking a different but converging road, halted for the night at Blue Springs, on the plantation of General Gordon. At this point the command was turned out, to destroy the Augusta Railroad, which was effectually accomplished for several miles. A large amount of cotton (one hundred and fifty (150) bales) and corn, rea
Turkey Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
P. M., the trains were all gotten safely through the swamp, and the column moved slowly on. At eight P. M., it reached Turkey Creek and Swamp, and at ten P. M., encamped one mile above Springfield. The distance marched on this day was fifteen miles.e, during the forenoon, I halted, and massed my troops and trains, until those preceding me moved on. As we approached Turkey Creek, the road improved. About one P. M. the rain ceased, and the sun shone out warm and pleasant. At two P. M., reached Turkey Creek, quite a wide, fordable stream, with good bottom. Across this creek the corps pioneers had constructed a bridge for the troops, after cutting away a quantity of timber which had been felled to hinder our progress. By five P. M., the diossed a big swamp and camped for the night. 7th. Marched at seven A. M.; Twenty-ninth assisted the trains, crossed Turkey Creek, at dark camped near Springfield. 8th. Moved at seven A. M.; marched twelve miles and camped for the night. 6th
Snapfinger Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
to Decatur, where the train was parked for more complete organization. From Decatur we took the direct road to Lattimer's, with cavalry in advance. Detachments of cavalry were also sent to the right, on the road to Flat Shoals, and to the left, toward Stone Mountain, all converging at Lattimer's, where we encamped for the first night. On the twenty-second, some four hundred and fifty (450) wagons were loaded with corn in season to move back two and a half miles toward Decatur, to Snapfinger Creek, where we encamped for the second night. By noon of the twenty-third, all the wagons were loaded, and the head of the column moved out on the return march, with the intention of parking in Decatur for the third night. Just at this time, Colonel Carman, with his brigade, reported, with communication from corps headquarters. Coming up in our rear, he moved his brigade to the head of the column, which occasioned some delay. The last of the train was parked at Decatur at half-past 1 o'c
Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
erienced as we moved along the river-bank from squads of rebel cavalry on the opposite shore. They were, however, soon driven off. A small party sent out from my command crossed the river near the burnt bridge, and went on foot seven miles, to Greensboro, driving a small force of cavalry through the town, and taking possession of it. After remaining in undisturbed possession of the town for several hours, and having convinced the inhabitants that the most of General Sherman's army was close by, with designs upon Augusta, this little party returned safely, recrossing the river in canoes. I learned the next day that the enemy were tearing up the Georgia Railroad at Union Point, seven miles east of Greensboro, apparently being possessed with the idea that General Sherman's army was moving on Augusta, and using the railroad as it came. From all I could learn, then and since, it is my opinion that my small command could at that time have penetrated to Augusta, without serious opposition
Arabia Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
ed down upon the right flank of the train to Flat Rock, and encamped for the night. October 23.-ce of the brigade, at four P. M., on road to Flat Rock Shoals, to cover the return of a foraging trWent in light marching order, and arrived at Flat Rock Shoals at eleven o'clock P. M., having marchn; afterward struck off to right, on road to Flat Rock, halting at eight P. M., near South River, aer 12.--Crossed South-River at Clark's Mill, Flat Rock, De Kalb County, marching southeasterly fivet, under command of Colonel Robinson, to Flat Rock, Georgia; and the second, under command of Brigadcted. October 12.--Crossed South-River at Flat Rock, and during the day loaded about three hundral Geary, which proceeded to the vicinity of Flat Rock Shoals, about twenty miles from Atlanta, andhe regiment with brigade went into camp near Flat Rock, at eight P. M., having marched eighteen milbeing intercepted, and in two expeditions to Flat Rock and Stone Mountain, respectively, a good sup[1 more...]
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...