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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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h, this phenomenon might, however, possibly have happened; for in about thirty days, with our defective means of transportation, we had collected at Corinth, from Murfreesboroa, Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, and other distant points, an effective force of over forty thousand men of all arms, while the Federals had failed to bring together, in time, at Pittsburg Landing, notwithstanding their ample means of land and water transportation, the armies of Buell, from Nashville, Tennessee, and of Pope, from southeast Missouri. Yet the Confederate army had advanced and was then assembled at Monterey and vicinity, less than nine miles in his front. Our forces, as they had arrived in the afternoon of the 5th, at the intersection of the Griersford (Lick Creek) and Ridge roads, from Corinth to Pittsburg, less than two miles from the Shiloh meeting-house, were formed into three lines of battle; the first, under General Hardee, extended from near Owl Creek, on the left, to near Lick Creek,
G. B. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 20
m, portions arriving daily up to the 27th. General Hardee took position in the vicinity, with a body of about eight thousand men; while the remainder, under General Crittenden—some five thousand strong, exclusive of cavalry—were halted at Beirnsville and Iuka, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. A shade of sadness, if not Army of Kentucky, less the cavalry, artillery, and infantry hereinafter limited, and detached as reserves. 4. The infantry reserves, under command of Major-General G. B. Crittenden, shall be formed of a division of not less than two brigades. These infantry reserves, at Beirnsville, were under Brigadier-General Breckinridge, who had succeeded General Crittenden. IV. The brigades of each army corps and of the reserve will be so formed as to consist severally of about two thousand five hundred total infantry, and one light battery of six pieces, if practicable. V. Divisions shall consist of not less than two brigades and one regiment of cavalry.
April 3rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 20
in, and make, the advance, with their respective corps, to the vicinity of the enemy's position, as will be found set forth in the written order, which was afterwards printed as follows: Headquarters army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 3d, 1862. Special orders, no. 8. I. In the impending movement, the corps of this army will march, assemble, and take order of battle, in the following manner, it being assumed that the enemy is in position about a mile in advance of Shiloh Church, By command of General A. S. Johnston, Thomas Jordan, A. Adjt.-Gen. Corinth, Miss., April 18th, 1862. The foregoing plan of operations and orders of engagement were drawn up and submitted by General Beauregard, on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, to General A. S. Johnston, who accepted the same without modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brig.-Gen. and A. A. G. The following passage is taken from a statement of Colonel D. Urquhart, of General Bragg's staff, addr
April 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 20
t modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brig.-Gen. and A. A. G. The following passage is taken from a statement of Colonel D. Urquhart, of General Bragg's staff, addressed to General Jordan. It confirms, as the reader will see, all that precedes: Narragansett, R. I., August 25th, 1880. My dear General,—I am in receipt of your letter of—, and in reply have to say, that I remember the visit of General A. S. Johnston, accompanied by yourself, the night of the 2d of April, 1862, to the headquarters or apartments of General Bragg, at Corinth, Mississippi. On that occasion, I was not present through the whole interview, but while the interview lasted I was in and out of the room repeatedly, and know that that interview was had for the consideration of a proposition on the part of General Beauregard, conveyed through you, that the Confederate army should, the very next day, advance to attack the Federal forces at or about Pittsburg Landing. And I know, also, t
March 27th (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 19: Arrival of General Johnston at Corinth. position of his troops on the 27th of March. offers to turn over command of the army to General Beauregard, who declines. General Beauregard urges an early offensive movement against the enemy, and gives his views as to plan of organizing the forces. General Johnston authorizes him to complete the organization already begun. General orders of March 29th. reasons why the army was formed into small corps. General Beauregard desirous of moving against the enemy on the 1st of April. why it was not done. on the 2d, General Cheatham reports a strong Federal force threatening his front. General Beauregard advises an immediate advance. General Johnston yields. General Jordan's statement of his interview with General Johnston on that occasion. special orders no. 8, otherwise called order of March and battle. by whom suggested and by whom written. General Beauregard explains the order to corps commanders. tardiness
April 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 20
of six pieces each, amounting in all to at least forty-three thousand men, occupied the ground between the Shiloh meeting-house and the river, in three lines of encampments, as already stated. General Sherman, in his sworn testimony before a courtmar-tial which, in August, 1862, tried Colonel Thomas Worthington of the 46th Ohio Volunteers, for severely criticising his management before the battle of Shiloh, said, of the position occupied by the Federals: But even as we were on the 6th of April, 1862, you might search the world over and not find a more advantageous field of battle; flanks well-protected, and never threatened; troops in easy support; timber and broken ground giving good points to rally; and the proof is, that forty-three thousand men, of whom at least ten thousand ran away, held their ground against sixty thousand chosen troops of the South with their best leaders. On Friday, the 4th, no officers nor soldiers, not even Colonel Worthington, looked for an attack, as
March 22nd (search for this): chapter 20
ment into a reconnoissance in force. General Johnston decides otherwise, and orders preparations for an attack at dawn next day. description of the field of Shiloh. strength of the Federal forces. what General Sherman testified to. we form into three lines of battle. our effective strength. carelessness and oversight of the Federal commanders. they are not aroused by the many sounds in their front, and are taken by surprise.> General Johnston reached Corinth on the night of the 22d of March, in advance of his army, which followed closely after him, portions arriving daily up to the 27th. General Hardee took position in the vicinity, with a body of about eight thousand men; while the remainder, under General Crittenden—some five thousand strong, exclusive of cavalry—were halted at Beirnsville and Iuka, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. A shade of sadness, if not of despondency, rested upon General Johnston's brow. The keen anxiety and still-increasing gloom overspr
August, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 20
low Pittsburg. Another, near the river bank, crossing Snake Creek by a bridge, also connects the two points. The Federal forces—five divisions of infantry, four or five squadrons of cavalry, and sixteen light batteries of six pieces each, amounting in all to at least forty-three thousand men, occupied the ground between the Shiloh meeting-house and the river, in three lines of encampments, as already stated. General Sherman, in his sworn testimony before a courtmar-tial which, in August, 1862, tried Colonel Thomas Worthington of the 46th Ohio Volunteers, for severely criticising his management before the battle of Shiloh, said, of the position occupied by the Federals: But even as we were on the 6th of April, 1862, you might search the world over and not find a more advantageous field of battle; flanks well-protected, and never threatened; troops in easy support; timber and broken ground giving good points to rally; and the proof is, that forty-three thousand men, of whom at l
the repulse of our raw troops. that, under these circumstances, and for the further reason that the enemy, being on the alert, Buell's junction would no doubt be hastened, he was no longer in favor of making the attack, but favored inviting one by turning this offensive movement into a reconnoissance in force, to draw the enemy after us nearer to our base—Corinth—and thereby detach him further from his own, at Pittsburg Landing. Somewhat similar strategy had been resorted to by Wellington in 1810, when, advancing to attack Massena at Santarem, he unexpectedly found that able officer on his guard, ready for battle, on ground of his own choosing, and much stronger than he had anticipated. After making some demonstrations in front of his wily adversary, to draw him away from his stronghold, Wellington did not hesitate to retire without giving battle. General Beauregard's views produced a visible effect on all present. General Johnston, although shaken, after some reflection said th
March 29th (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 19: Arrival of General Johnston at Corinth. position of his troops on the 27th of March. offers to turn over command of the army to General Beauregard, who declines. General Beauregard urges an early offensive movement against the enemy, and gives his views as to plan of organizing the forces. General Johnston authorizes him to complete the organization already begun. General orders of March 29th. reasons why the army was formed into small corps. General Beauregard desirous of moving against the enemy on the 1st of April. why it was not done. on the 2d, General Cheatham reports a strong Federal force threatening his front. General Beauregard advises an immediate advance. General Johnston yields. General Jordan's statement of his interview with General Johnston on that occasion. special orders no. 8, otherwise called order of March and battle. by whom suggested and by whom written. General Beauregard explains the order to corps commanders. tardiness
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