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J. W. Goethe (search for this): chapter 2
tributed to Holmes or Motley or Tom Appleton, so one sees to this day phrases credited to Emerson which really belonged to Alcott or Parker or Hedge. The late John S. Dwight was perhaps more boldly robbed and complimented than any other of his circle; since his poem called Rest, --Sweet is the pleasure Itself cannot spoil; Is not true leisure One with true toil? still appears periodically as an occasional resurrection in the newspapers, but always as a translation from some supposed poem of Goethe. Dwight was very probably a divinity student at Cambridge when this poem was composed, he having left that institution in 1836; and enough has at any rate been written to show that Cambridge was in many respects the seed-ground of that intellectual impulse which was harvested later at the house of Emerson in Concord, whither he removed in 1834, having left Cambridge in 1826. It is to be observed also that, of the later writers in the Dial, Christopher Pearce Cranch, who wrote much in it
Margaret Fuller (search for this): chapter 2
n becoming himself a Harvard professor; and if he had done the same, after Margaret Fuller's tragic death, with his personal attack on her, he would have averted mucthis club on September 18, 1839, Mr. Alcott records in his memoranda that Margaret Fuller gave her views of the proposed Dial, which she afterwards edited. This isI, 1839): Half a dozen men exhaust our list of contributors; Emerson, Hedge, Miss Fuller, Ripley, [W. H.] Channing, Dwight, [J. F.] Clarke, are our dependence. It is to be noticed that, of this club of seven, Hedge and Miss Fuller were Cambridge born; Emerson and Channing had resided in Cambridge with their parents; while all but Miss Fuller were Harvard graduates. This certainly established at the outset a very close connection between the new literary movement and Old Cambridge; and among address, The editors to the reader, by Emerson, An essay on critics, by Margaret Fuller,--both these being in the first number,--and an essay in the second number
J. L. Motley (search for this): chapter 2
oncentrate on a single name, and just as for years every good thing said in Boston was ultimately attributed to Holmes or Motley or Tom Appleton, so one sees to this day phrases credited to Emerson which really belonged to Alcott or Parker or Hedge. , etc., with no result. He has already spoken of a previous meeting (May 5), when he dined in town with Emerson, Lowell, Motley, Holmes, Cabot, Underwood, and the publisher Phillips, to talk about the new magazine the last wishes to establish. It wpart from their mere college training. And it may fairly be claimed that their labors were not quite wasted, inasmuch as Motley, who was not a Cambridge resident, wrote from England on May 16, 1858, that the Atlantic Monthly was at that time unquest were not quite wasted, inasmuch as Motley, who was not a Cambridge resident, wrote from England on May 16, 1858, that the Atlantic Monthly was at that time unquestionably the best magazine in the English language. Motley's Letters, I. p. 224.
William Tudor (search for this): chapter 2
ors may be considered as a true revival of polite learning in this country, after that decay and neglect which resulted from the distractions of the Revolutionary War, and as forming an epoch in the intellectual history of the United States. This epoch may, however, be better indicated by the foundation of the North American Review, which immediately followed. This periodical, during far the larger part of its early career, was under the editorship of Cambridge men. After the first editor, William Tudor, there came a long line of Cambridge successors — Willard Phillips, Edward Tyrrel Channing, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norton —— all Harvard in<
John Fiske (search for this): chapter 2
not at some time dwelt in Cambridge. The following list comprises many of those who were during at least some period of the Atlantic's existence, if not the whole, to be classed as Cambridge authors, together with the total of contributions credited to each in the Atlantic Index, of 1888: W. D. Howells, 399; T. S. Perry, 355; H. E. Scudder, 196; O. W. Holmes, 18I; G. P. Lathrop, 168; W. F. Apthorp, 134; Henry James, Jr., 134; J. R. Lowell, 132; T. W. Higginson, 117; T. B. Aldrich, I I; John Fiske, 89; G. E. Woodberry, 73; H. W. Longfellow, 68; C. P. Cranch, 45; C. E. Norton, 44; N. S. Shaler, 32; R. W. Emerson, 29; Henry James, Sr., 19; W. W. Story, 17; Wilson Flagg, 14; William James, 12. This is, of course, a merely quantitative estimate, in which a brief critical paper may count for as much as the most important original work; but the point of interest is that it comprises almost every one of those who were, tried by this numerical standard, the main contributors. Thus judged,
George Ripley (search for this): chapter 2
atter writing, Your periodical plan charms me. In the autumn of 1836, the bicentennial of Harvard University was held, and four young clergymen — Emerson, Hedge, Ripley, and Putnam-had an almost casual meeting at Willard's Hotel, now the electric railway station at Harvard Square in Cambridge; where began a series of consultation to represent; but Alcott writes of its prospects in his diary (November I, 1839): Half a dozen men exhaust our list of contributors; Emerson, Hedge, Miss Fuller, Ripley, [W. H.] Channing, Dwight, [J. F.] Clarke, are our dependence. It is to be noticed that, of this club of seven, Hedge and Miss Fuller were Cambridge born; Emersor. Hildreth (very much interested in the undertaking), Thos. W. Parsons, author of an excellent translation of Dante, Parke Godwin of the New York Evening Post, Mr. Ripley of the Tribune, Dr. Elder of Phila, H. D. Thoreau of Concord, Theodore Parker (my most valued friend), Edmund Quincy, James R. Lowell (from whom I have a most e
J. G. Whittier (search for this): chapter 2
porary. Poetry, of course, we pay for according to value. There are not above six men in America (known to me) to whom I would pay anything for poetry. There is no medium; it is good or it is good-for-nothing. Lowell I esteem most; after him Whittier (the last I confidently expect to secure). The first no. will probably be late — as late as Jan. 5, or even Ioth. It is unavoidable. But in Feb. we shall get before the wind. Mr. Jewett will be liberal as to heresy. Indeed he is almost it may almost be said that the bulk of the magazine, for a long series of years, has been furnished by those who may in some sense be claimed as Cambridge authors. In fact, the only other person whose contributions reached the hundred mark was Whittier. It is thus evident that in the case of the Atlantic Monthly, as with the North American Review and the Dial, nearly all the editors and most of the larger contributors were either natives of Cambridge or at some time residents there, apart
W. D. Howells (search for this): chapter 2
ginal editors, Lowell and Underwood, were Cantabrigians by residence; and Lowell could now transfer to it, on a more liberal scale, the plans which he and Robert Carter had formed for the short-lived Pioneer. In the later period of the magazine, Howells at one time resided in Cambridge, as did, for a year, his successor, Aldrich. Its last two editors, Messrs. H. E. Scudder and W. H. Page, have been and still are denizens of the University city. There has thus been no editor of the magazine, eng list comprises many of those who were during at least some period of the Atlantic's existence, if not the whole, to be classed as Cambridge authors, together with the total of contributions credited to each in the Atlantic Index, of 1888: W. D. Howells, 399; T. S. Perry, 355; H. E. Scudder, 196; O. W. Holmes, 18I; G. P. Lathrop, 168; W. F. Apthorp, 134; Henry James, Jr., 134; J. R. Lowell, 132; T. W. Higginson, 117; T. B. Aldrich, I I; John Fiske, 89; G. E. Woodberry, 73; H. W. Longfellow,
Frederic Henry Hedge (search for this): chapter 2
The plan of a new periodical had been discussed between Hedge and Margaret Fullerboth natives of Cambridge — as early as rd University was held, and four young clergymen — Emerson, Hedge, Ripley, and Putnam-had an almost casual meeting at Willarduse its meetings were timed to suit the occasional visit of Hedge, then settled in Bangor, Maine. At a meeting of this club Half a dozen men exhaust our list of contributors; Emerson, Hedge, Miss Fuller, Ripley, [W. H.] Channing, Dwight, [J. F.] Clapendence. It is to be noticed that, of this club of seven, Hedge and Miss Fuller were Cambridge born; Emerson and Channing hustible reader and a patient editor. Her friend, Dr. Frederic Henry Hedge, who had been five years in Germany, had taken hind number called The art of life; the scholar's calling, by Hedge. The latter has passages distinctly bearing on our literarted to Emerson which really belonged to Alcott or Parker or Hedge. The late John S. Dwight was perhaps more boldly robbed an
Edmund Spenser (search for this): chapter 2
th his personal attack on her, he would have averted much criticism on himself. Robert Carter, who thus defeated Bowen and was afterwards intimately associated with Lowell in both literature and life, was one of those gifted eccentrics who gravitated to Cambridge in earlier days, perhaps more freely than now. He had known extreme poverty, and used to tell the story of his mother and himself walking the streets of a city in central New York and spending their last half-dollar on a copy of Spenser's Faerie Queene, instead of a dinner. He was a man of wide reading, great memory, and great inventive power; his favorite work in embryo being a tale which was to occupy twelve volumes each as large as Sue's Wandering Jew, then widely read. Two of these volumes were to contain an incidental summary of the history of the world, told by a heavenly spirit to a man wandering among the Mountains of the Moon in Africa. He came to Cambridge under Lowell's patronage and secured a place in the p
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