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Moses King (search for this): chapter 7
with all its imperfections thick upon it, trusting it will lead someone else to seek out the history and grow to love stories of Cambridge as do I, to whom its dust is dear. For assistance in preparing the facts contained in this article I am indebted to the courtesy of the Rev. William B. King and Dr. McKenzie. I have also learned much from the following authorities: History of Shepard Church, Dr. McKenzie; The Cambridge of 1776, by Mr. Arthur Gilman; Harvard and its Surroundings, Mr. Moses King; Christ Church, Cambridge, Mr. S. F. Batchelder, and from other works of a like nature. Maples in autumn. How fairly shows yon distant maple, shedding Its blood-red leaves upon the forest ground, Those very leaves that not long since were wedding The young spring breeze with modest rustling sound! Its yearly tribute done, 'twill be left standing To wrestle naked with the winter breeze, And, by such change deciduous, grow commanding And flourish lofty 'mid its sister trees. Might we
Constance Grosvenor Alexander (search for this): chapter 7
Historic churches and homes of Cambridge. Constance Grosvenor Alexander. In a sketch necessarily so brief as this must be, much can be merely touched on, much must be omitted that would be of interest to all who visit our beautiful, historic town. All that the writer can hope to do is to make these brief comments of sufficient interest to serve as guides to the tourist, or as finger-posts to storehouses of knowledge from which the curious may extract the hoards to be had there for the asking. Cambridge has been called the first capital of our infant republic, the cradle of our nascent liberties, the hearth of our kindling patriotism. Intimately associated as indeed it is with the stirring times of the Revolution, its two oldest churches, Christ Church, Episcopal, and Shepard Congregational, have their history most intimately woven with that of the patriots. First let us take Shepard Church the first church in Cambridge, because it is the oldest society, though its present
Increase Mather (search for this): chapter 7
ing, soul-ravishing preacher. Next to Shepard came Mitchel, almost equally celebrated for piety and eloquence. Cotton Mather and Richard Baxter praise him highly, and President Increase Mather said to his students, Say, each of you, Mitchel shallPresident Increase Mather said to his students, Say, each of you, Mitchel shall be the example whom I will imitate. During this pastorate, Dunster was convicted of Anabaptist views and was compelled to resign in 1654. In 1671 Uriah Oakes came over from England to be pastor. After the enforced resignation of President Hoarchurch Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, interesting as one who fell on stirring times. At his installation Cotton and Increase Mather took part. His degree of D. D., was the second granted by Harvard, the first being that given to Increase Mather. Dr. Mather. Dr. Appleton's pastorate lasted sixty years. Under him General Washington often worshipped. In his church met the delegates from the towns of the state to frame the constitution of the commonwealth. In his church, too, on October 17, the First Provinci
Thomas Hilliard (search for this): chapter 7
Between Christ Church and the First Parish Church lies the old peaceful graveyard, ablaze in autumn with golden-rod. The yard is fully two hundred and sixty-four years old, and had been used about one hundred and thirty years before Christ Church was built. Here lie Stephen Day, first printer of this continent north of Mexico; Elijah Corlet, first master of the Faire Grammar School; Thomas Shepard, first pastor in Cambridge; also Jonathan Mitchell, Nathaniel Gookin, William Brattle, Thomas Hilliard, and Mr. Appleton; and of the Harvard presidents, Dunster, Chauncy (on whose tomb is a Latin inscription), Oakes, Leverett, Wadsworth, Holyoke, Willard and Webber. Here are also Governor Belcher, Judge Remington, Mrs. Brattle; and under Christ Church is the old Vassall tomb, containing ten coffins-those of the family and also one of the black servants of the family, and one probably of Lieutenant Brown, the English officer who was shot by a sentry. In the yard stands a monument erect
John Vassall (search for this): chapter 7
sking aid to build an Episcopal Church in Cambridge. It was desired by five or six gentlemen, each of whose incomes, says an authority, was judged to be adequate to the maintenance of a domestic chaplain. The letter, signed by Henry Vassall, John Vassall, Tho. Oliver, Robt. Temple, Joseph Lee, Ralph Inman, David Phipps and James Apthorp, was drawn up by Dr. Caner, rector of King's Chapel, Boston. The aid granted, these gentlemen proceeded,in 1761, to the erection of a church, over which Rev. and of the Harvard presidents, Dunster, Chauncy (on whose tomb is a Latin inscription), Oakes, Leverett, Wadsworth, Holyoke, Willard and Webber. Here are also Governor Belcher, Judge Remington, Mrs. Brattle; and under Christ Church is the old Vassall tomb, containing ten coffins-those of the family and also one of the black servants of the family, and one probably of Lieutenant Brown, the English officer who was shot by a sentry. In the yard stands a monument erected to the memory of Mr. Hi
Peter Harrison (search for this): chapter 7
ive or six gentlemen, each of whose incomes, says an authority, was judged to be adequate to the maintenance of a domestic chaplain. The letter, signed by Henry Vassall, John Vassall, Tho. Oliver, Robt. Temple, Joseph Lee, Ralph Inman, David Phipps and James Apthorp, was drawn up by Dr. Caner, rector of King's Chapel, Boston. The aid granted, these gentlemen proceeded,in 1761, to the erection of a church, over which Rev. East Apthorp was made rector. The architect of the church was Mr. Peter Harrison, Newport, R. I., who also designed King's Chapel (ten years earlier), and the Redwood Library and City Hall in Newport. The land was bought, the rear half from James Reed, the rest from the owners of the common. Some say the pillars were turned on the common, but certain it is that the frame was not brought from England. Expense was not spared in furnishing the church. A fine organ, made John Snetzler of London, a bell weighing over fifteen hundred pounds, a silver christening ba
John Chester (search for this): chapter 7
time during which Christ Church was beaten upon by the waves of a wild tide of patriotism. The rector was forced to fly and had but a troubled life of it thereafter. In the summer of 1774 the last regular services before the Revolution were held in the church. The only member left was Judge Lee, who was unmolested because his principles were mild. Now for a space the church ministered to the soldiers' bodily rather than to their spiritual needs. After Lexington, the company of Captain John Chester from Wethersfield, Conn., was quartered in the church. There is still a bullet mark in the porch as a reminder of this period. The sole member who took the colonial side, John Pidgeon, was appointed commissary-general to the forces. The rest, Tories, fled to General Gage in Boston. General Washington, a good churchman, though for reasons of expediency he often worshipped with his men at the Congregational meeting house (then under Dr. Appleton), when Mrs. Washington came, Dec. 3
William B. King (search for this): chapter 7
has ebbed away for a tidal-hour, leaving bare the quiet shore of the past, seamed and lined with the traces of two centuries tides. In some such a summer I have written this brief account and now send it forth, with all its imperfections thick upon it, trusting it will lead someone else to seek out the history and grow to love stories of Cambridge as do I, to whom its dust is dear. For assistance in preparing the facts contained in this article I am indebted to the courtesy of the Rev. William B. King and Dr. McKenzie. I have also learned much from the following authorities: History of Shepard Church, Dr. McKenzie; The Cambridge of 1776, by Mr. Arthur Gilman; Harvard and its Surroundings, Mr. Moses King; Christ Church, Cambridge, Mr. S. F. Batchelder, and from other works of a like nature. Maples in autumn. How fairly shows yon distant maple, shedding Its blood-red leaves upon the forest ground, Those very leaves that not long since were wedding The young spring breeze with
Richard Baxter (search for this): chapter 7
on the site of which the Washington Grammar School now stands. In 1642 the first college commencement was held in the First Church. In 1649 a new church was erected on nearly the present site of Dane Hall at Harvard Square. In this same year, before the church was completed, Mr. Shepard died. We have the record of him as the holy, heavenly, sweet-affecting, soul-ravishing preacher. Next to Shepard came Mitchel, almost equally celebrated for piety and eloquence. Cotton Mather and Richard Baxter praise him highly, and President Increase Mather said to his students, Say, each of you, Mitchel shall be the example whom I will imitate. During this pastorate, Dunster was convicted of Anabaptist views and was compelled to resign in 1654. In 1671 Uriah Oakes came over from England to be pastor. After the enforced resignation of President Hoar of Harvard, Oakes was appointed superintendent and later president (1679). In 1717 came to the church Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, interestin
George Washington (search for this): chapter 7
Increase Mather. Dr. Appleton's pastorate lasted sixty years. Under him General Washington often worshipped. In his church met the delegates from the towns of the eral to the forces. The rest, Tories, fled to General Gage in Boston. General Washington, a good churchman, though for reasons of expediency he often worshipped wis men at the Congregational meeting house (then under Dr. Appleton), when Mrs. Washington came, Dec. 31, 1775, had Christ Church re-opened for a service which he at. One is still shown the place where his hat was laid, near the threshold. General and Mrs. Washington probably occupied Robert Temple's pew, third from the froMrs. Washington probably occupied Robert Temple's pew, third from the front, on the left wall, now the slip opposite the sixth pillar from the door, says Mr. Batchelder. A queer little uncomfortable wooden pew is shown you, if you climb In 1800, on February 22, there was a service in commemoration of the death of Washington. In 1824 full repairs were made, the box pews were changed to square, and ot
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