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skirmishers, who had insinuated themselves into the thickets behind him. It was now four o'clock in the afternoon, and the Federalists were as yet only repulsed, and not routed. They were still bringing up fresh masses, and, on the eminences fronting that from which they had just been driven, were forming an imposing line of battle, crescent-shaped, with the convex side toward the Confederates, for a final effort. But their hour had passed. The reserves from the extreme right, under Early and Holmes, were now at hand; and better still, the Manassa's Gap Railroad, cleared of its obstructions, was again pouring down the remainder of the Army of the Valley. General Kirby Smith led a body of these direct to the field, and receiving at once a dangerous wound, was replaced by Colonel Arnold Elzy, whom Beauregard styled the Blucher of his Waterloo. These troops being hurled against the enemy's right, while the victorious Confederates in the centre turned against them their own arti
til all its supports were routed. He brought up the other two guns of Stanard, and also the Pendleton battery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-Colonel Echols, lying upon their breasts to avoid the storm of cannon-shot. On the right of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel Allen, and the 33d led by Colonel Cummings. Both ends of the brigade, when thus disposed, penetrated the thickets on the right and left, and the 33d was wholly masked by them. On the right of Jackson's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under him and Evans, had hitherto borne the heat and burden of the day, while, on the left, a few regiments of Virginian and Carolinian troops were stationed. At
ur arms with victory. . .. If General Lee remains in the Northwest, I would like to go there and give my feeble aid, as an humble instrument in the hand of Providence, in retrieving the down-trodden loyalty of that part of my native State. But I desire to be wherever those over me may decide, and I am content to be here (Manassas). The success of my cause is the earthly object near my heart, and, if I know myself, all that I am and have is at the service of my country. To his friend, Colonel Bennet, first auditor of the Commonwealth, he wrote, August 27th:-- My hopes for our section of the State have greatly brightened since General Lee has gone there. Something brilliant may be expected in that region. Should you ever have occasion to ask for a brigade from this army for the Northwest, I hope that mine will be the one selected. This of course is confidential, as it is my duty to serve wherever I may be placed, and I desire to be always where most needed. But it is natural
ports in the rear of the batteries were still better shielded. Here, then, he began the new formation, by putting in position two guns of Stanard's battery, with the regiments which headed his column of march, and, while the remainder came to the ground designed for them, these two pieces held the enemy in check by their accurate fire. The opposing batteries were then upon the hill beyond the valley in front, which was also swarming with heavy masses of Federal infantry. Jackson recalled Imboden's battery, which had entered the action with General Bee's command, and gallantly maintained a perilous position until all its supports were routed. He brought up the other two guns of Stanard, and also the Pendleton battery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-C
Henry Jackson (search for this): chapter 8
rming with heavy masses of Federal infantry. Jackson recalled Imboden's battery, which had entered It was then that this general rode up to Jackson, and with despairing bitterness exclaimed, General, they are beating us back! Then, said Jackson, calm and curt, we will give them the bayonet.r-tasked command, exclaimed to them, There is Jackson standing like a stone wall. Rally behind the the critical success. For nearly four hours, Jackson had held the enemy at bay; and the precious sof the contested arena, and the battery which Jackson had twice taken. But the other troops which the stubborn and useful fighting was done by Jackson and his command. Other officers and other brave made surrender inevitable. In this sense Jackson may be said to have won the first Battle of Mf war to every coast and river of the South. Jackson had the mind to comprehend the inestimable vamore with so uncertain an instrument. But Jackson was more than the professional soldier. Leav[21 more...]
Cummins Jackson (search for this): chapter 8
the eastern slope of the mountain. Here General Jackson turned his brigade into an enclosure occuould be aroused, and a guard set. No, replied Jackson, let the poor fellows sleep; I will guard theeir destination more easily by railroad. General Jackson's infantry was placed upon trains there, g before the commencement of the battle. General Jackson's whole command reached the Junction at d the other two were those of Generals Bee and Jackson, and the heroism of these two was sufficient igent view of the important part borne by General Jackson in the battle. At four o'clock on the moeet the enemy descending from Sudley. But as Jackson advanced in this direction, the firing becameands were disheartened and almost broken. As Jackson advanced to their assistance, he met the fragown in open fields to a valley, which divided Jackson at the moment from the advancing enemy; but t of a yard in depth. The soldierly eye of Jackson, at a glance, perceived that this was the spo[3 more...]
Beauregard (search for this): chapter 8
McDowell. The fearful preponderance against Beauregard could at any time have been increased, by sufirst appearance of the Federal advance, General Beauregard had given notice to General Johnston, thversary was gone until his junction with General Beauregard was effected, when he sluggishly drew ofeir destination. Our gallant army under General Beauregard, said this order, is now attacked by oveies, by whom they were sent, miscarried; and Beauregard, after listening in anxious suspense to hearthis stage of affairs, Generals Johnston and Beauregard galloped to the front, inspiriting the men bd, was replaced by Colonel Arnold Elzy, whom Beauregard styled the Blucher of his Waterloo. These tit did, and so are my Generals, Johnston and Beauregard. ... I am thankful to our ever kind heavenlyquestions of the citizens, some replied that Beauregard, with his bloody horsemen, was just beyond te again detached and sent westward; that General Beauregard should be left near Manassas with his co[7 more...]
iladelphia Press declared that no man of sense could, for a moment, doubt that this much-ado-about-nothing would end in a month. The Northern people were simply invincible. The rebels, a mere band of ragamuffins, will fly, like chaff before the wind, on our approach. But who can wonder that the press of America should pander thus to the ignorance and the arrogance of the North, when Seward himself, just a month before the Battle of Manassas, wrote thus in a public document, addressed to Mr. Dayton, the Minister at the French Court: France seems to have mistaken a mere casual and ephemeral insurrection here, such as is incidental in the experience of all nations, for a war, which has flagrantly separated this nation into two co-existing political powers, who are contending in arms against each other, after the separation. And again: It is erroneous to suppose that any war exists in the United States. Certainly there cannot be two belligerent powers, where there is no war. Read in
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 8
wn, and then to turn southeastward towards Millwood and the fords of the Shenandoah. As they passed through the streets of Winchester, the citizens, whose hospitality the soldiers had so often enjoyed, asked, with sad and astonished faces, if they were deserting them, and handing them over to the Vandal enemy. They answered, with equal sadness, that they knew no more than others whither they were going. The 1st Virginia brigade, led by General Jackson, headed the march. The cavalry of Stuart guarded every pathway between the line of defence which Johnston had just held and the Federalists, and kept up an audacious front, as though they were about to advance upon them, supported by the whole army. The mystified commander of the Federalists stood anxiously on the defensive, and never discovered that his adversary was gone until his junction with General Beauregard was effected, when he sluggishly drew off his hosts towards Harper's Ferry. As soon as the troops had gone three mi
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 8
cements as could be spared from the centre and right successively, and as their line of battle was borne back from west to east, to repair its strength, and to increase its front by placing fresh troops at its south end, until it had sufficient extent and stability to breast the avalanche of Federal troops. The reader is now prepared for an intelligent view of the important part borne by General Jackson in the battle. At four o'clock on the morning of the 21st, he was requested by General Longstreet, whose brigade formed the right of the centre, to reinforce him with two regiments. With this he complied, until the appearance of an immediate attack was rumored. He was soon after ordered by General Beauregard to support Brigadier-General Bonham at Mitchell's Ford, then to support Brigadier-General Cocke above, and then to take an intermediate position where he could extend aid to either of the two. About ten o'clock A. M., General Cocke requested him to move to the Stone Bridge,
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