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Chorus
The breezes that blew from the Strymon, bringing harmful leisure, hunger, and tribulation of spirit in a cruel port, idle wandering of men, and sparing neither ship [195] nor cable, began, by doubling the season of their stay, to rub away and wither the flower of Argos; and when the seer, pointing to Artemis as cause, proclaimed to the chieftains another remedy, [200] more oppressive even than the bitter storm, so that the sons of Atreus struck the ground with their canes and did not stifle their tears—

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hide References (6 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (3):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 586
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Electra, 563
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 8.118
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (3):
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