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Chorus
But when he had donned the yoke of Necessity, with veering of mind, [220] impious, unholy, unsanctified, from that moment he changed his intention and began to conceive that deed of uttermost audacity. For wretched delusion, counsellor of ill, primal source of woe, makes mortals bold. So then he hardened his heart to sacrifice his daughter [225] so that he might further a war waged to avenge a woman, and as an offering for the voyage of a fleet!

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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 857
    • W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, Commentary on the Odyssey (1886), 6.184
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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