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Pisthetaerus
Oh! by the gods! how he is cajoling you. Step aside, that I may have a word with you. Your uncle is getting the better of you, my poor friend. [1650] The law will not allow you an obolus of the paternal property, for you are a bastard and not a legitimate child.

Heracles
I a bastard! What's that you tell me?

Pisthetaerus
Why, certainly; are you not born of a stranger woman? Besides, is not Athena recognized as Zeus' sole heiress? And no daughter would be that, if she had a legitimate brother.

Heracles
[1655] But what if my father wished to give me his property on his death-bed, even though I be a bastard?

Pisthetaerus
The law forbids it, and this same Poseidon would be the first to lay claim to his wealth, in virtue of being his legitimate brother. Listen; [1660] thus runs Solon's law: “A bastard shall not inherit, if there are [1665] legitimate children; and if there are no legitimate children, the property shall pass to the nearest kin.”

Heracles
And I get nothing whatever of the paternal property?

Pisthetaerus
Absolutely nothing. But tell me, has your father had you entered on the registers of his phratry?

Heracles
[1670] No, and I have long been surprised at the omission.

Pisthetaerus
Why do you shake your fist at heaven? Do you want to fight? Why, be on my side, I will make you a king and will feed you on bird's milk and honey.

Heracles
Your further condition seems fair to me. [1675] I cede you the young damsel.

Poseidon
But I, I vote against this opinion.

Pisthetaerus
Then it all depends on the Triballus. To the Triballus. What do you say?

Triballus
Givum bird pretty gel bigum queen.

Heracles
He says give her.

Poseidon
[1680] Why no, he does not say anything of the sort, or else, like the swallows he does not know how to walk.

Pisthetaerus
Exactly so. Does he not say she must be given to the swallows?

Poseidon
Resignedly.
All right, you two arrange the matter; make peace, since you wish it so; I'll hold my tongue.

Heracles
[1685] We are of a mind to grant you all that you ask. But come up there with us to receive Basileia and the celestial bounty.

Pisthetaerus
Here are birds already dressed, and very suitable for a nuptial feast.

Heracles
[1690] You go and, if you like, I will stay here to roast them.

Pisthetaerus
You to roast them? you are too much the glutton; come along with us.

Heracles
Ah! how well I would have treated myself!

Pisthetaerus
Let some one bring me a beautiful and magnificent tunic for the wedding.

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    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Tenses
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