previous next

Enter Strepsiades and Phidippides

Strep.
By Mist, you certainly shall not stay here any longer! But go and gnaw the columns of Megacles.

Phid.
My good sir, what is the matter with you, O father? You are not in your senses, by Olympian Jupiter!

Strep.
See, see, “Olympian Jupiter!” What folly! To think of your believing in Jupiter, as old as you are!

Phid.
Why, pray, did you laugh at this?

Strep.
Reflecting that you are a child, and have antiquated notions. Yet, however, approach, that you may know more; and I will tell you a thing, by learning which you will be a man. But see that you do not teach this to any one.

Phid.
Well, what is it?

Strep.
You swore now by Jupiter.

Phid.
I did.

Strep.
Seest thou, then, how good a thing is learning? There is no Jupiter, O Phidippides!

Phid.
Who then?

Strep.
Vortex reigns, having expelled Jupiter.

Phid.
Bah! Why do you talk foolishly?

Strep.
Be assured that it is so.

Phid.
Who says this?

Strep.
Socrates the Melian, and Chaerephon, who knows the footmarks of fleas.

Phid.
Have you arrived at such a pitch of frenzy that you believe madmen?

Strep.
Speak words of good omen, and say nothing bad of clever men and wise; of whom, through frugality, none ever shaved or anointed himself, or went to a bath to wash himself; while you squander my property in bathing, as if I were already dead. But go as quickly as possible and learn instead of me.

Phid.
What good could any one learn from them?

Strep.
What, really? Whatever wisdom there is among men. And you will know yourself, how ignorant and stupid you are. But wait for me here a short time.

Runs off

Phid.
Ah me! What shall I do, my father being crazed? Shall I bring him into court and convict him of lunacy, or shall I give information of his madness to the coffin-makers?

Re-enter Strepsiades with a cock under one arm and a hen under the other

Strep.
Come, let me see; what do you consider this to be? Tell me.

Phid.
Alectryon.

Strep.
Right. And what this?

Phid.
Alectryon.

Strep.
Both the same? You are very ridiculous. Do not do so, then, for the future; but call this alektryaina, and this one alektor.

Phid.
Alektryaina! Did you learn these clever things by going in just now to the Titans?

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (4 total)
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: