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Cario
To Chremylus
[170] Is it not he who lends the Great King all his pride?

Chremylus
Is it not he who draws the citizens to the Assembly?

Cario
And tell me, is it not you who equip the triremes?

Chremylus
And who feed our mercenaries at Corinth?

Cario
Are not you the cause of Pamphilus' sufferings?

Chremylus
[175] And of the needle-seller's with Pamphilus?

Cario
It is not because of you that Agyrrhius farts so loudly?

Chremylus
And that Philepsius rolls off his fables? That troops are sent to succour the Egyptians? And that Lais is kept by Philonides?

Cario
[180] That the tower of Timotheus—

Chremylus
To Cario May it fall upon your head! To Plutus In short, Plutus, it is through you that everything is done; you must realize that you are the sole cause both of good and evil.

Cario
In war, [185] it's the flag under which you serve that victory favours.

Plutus
What! I can do so many things by myself and unaided?

Chremylus
And many others besides; wherefore men are never tired of your gifts. They get weary of all else, — [190] of love ...

Cario
Bread.

Chremylus
Music.

Cario
Sweetmeats.

Chremylus
Honors.

Cario
Cakes.

Chremylus
Battles.

Cario
Figs.

Chremylus
Ambition.

Cario
Gruel.

Chremylus
Military advancement.

Cario
Lentil soup.

Chremylus
But of you they never tire. If a man has thirteen talents, [195] he has all the greater ardor to possess sixteen; if that wish is achieved, he will want forty or will complain that he knows not how to make both ends meet.

Plutus
All this, I suppose, is very true; there is but one point that makes me feel a bit uneasy.

Chremylus
And that is?

Plutus
[200] How could I use this power, which you say I have?

Chremylus
Ah! they were quite right who said there's nothing more timorous than Plutus.

Plutus
No, no; it was a thief who calumniated me. Having broken [205] into a house, he found everything locked up and could take nothing, so he dubbed my prudence fear.

Chremylus
Don't be disturbed; if you support me zealously, [210] I'll make you more sharp-sighted than Lynceus.

Plutus
And how should you be able to do that, you, who are but a mortal?

Chremylus
I have great hope, after the answer Apollo gave me, shaking his sacred laurels the while.

Plutus
Is he in the plot then?

Chremylus
Surely.

Plutus
[215] Take care what you say.

Chremylus
Never fear, friend; for, be well assured, that if it has to cost me my life, I will carry out what I have in my head.

Cario
And I will help you, if you permit it.

Chremylus
We shall have many other helpers as well —all the worthy folk who are wanting for bread.

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    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), MERCENA´RII
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