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TO LESBIA RECONCILED.

An to one ever accrue any boon he lusted and longed for
Any time after despair, grateful it comes to his soul.
Thus 'tis grateful to us nor gold was ever so goodly,
When thou restorest thyself (Lesbia!) to loving-most me,
Self thou restorest unhoped, and after despair thou returnest.
Oh the fair light of a Day noted with notabler white!
Where lives a happier man than myself or—this being won me—
Who shall e'er boast that his life brought him more coveted lot?

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load focus Notes (E. T. Merrill, 1893)
load focus Latin (E. T. Merrill)
load focus English (Leonard C. Smithers, 1894)
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hide References (8 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (6):
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 11
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 37
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 45
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 68b
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 8
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 9
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, Prosody.
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, Lesbia.
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