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OF THE SAME.

Mentula! masterest thou some thirty acres of grassland
Full told, forty of field soil; others are sized as the sea.
Why may he not surpass in his riches any a Crœsus
Who in his one domain owns such abundance of good,
Grasslands, arable fields, vast woods and forest and marish
Yonder to Boreal-bounds trenching on Ocean tide?
Great are indeed all these, but thou by far be the greatest,
Never a man, but a great Mentula of menacing might.

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load focus Notes (E. T. Merrill, 1893)
load focus English (Leonard C. Smithers, 1894)
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hide References (10 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 105
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 114
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 24
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 29
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 34
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 64
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 94
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