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What law was ever better, more advantageous, more frequently demanded in the best ages of the republic, than the one which forbade the praetorian provinces to be retained more than a year, and the consular provinces more than two? If this law be abrogated, do you think that the acts of Caesar are maintained? What? are not all the laws of Caesar respecting judicial proceedings abrogated by the law which had been proposed concerning the third decury? And are you the defenders of the acts of Caesar who overturn his laws? Unless, indeed, anything which, for the purpose of recollecting it, he entered in a notebook, is to be counted among his acts, and defended, however unjust or useless it may he; and that which he proposed to the people in the comitia centuriata and carried, is not to be accounted one of the acts of Caesar.

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load focus Latin (Albert Clark, Albert Curtis Clark, 1918)
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  • Cross-references to this page (4):
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), JUDEX
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PRAETOR
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PROCONSUL
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PROVIĀ“NCIA
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