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Peleus
Oh, how perverse customs are in Greece! When the army routs the enemy, [695] they do not regard this as the deed of those who have done the work, but rather the general receives the honor. He brandished his spear as one man among countless others and did no more than a single warrior, yet he gets more credit. [And sitting high and mighty in office in the city [700] they think grander thoughts than the commons though they are worthless. The people are far superior to them in wisdom if they acquired at once daring and will.] It is in this fashion that you and your brother sit puffed up over Troy and your generalship there, [705] made high and mighty by the toils and labors of others. But I will teach you not to regard Paris, shepherd of Mount Ida, a greater enemy to you than Peleus unless you clear off from this house at once, you and your childless daughter. This child, offspring of my loins, [710] shall drive her through this house, grasping her by the hair, if she, sterile heifer that she is, does not put up with others' having children just because she herself has none. If her luck in respect to children is bad, must we be bereft of offspring? [715] Clear away from this woman, slaves, so that I may learn whether anyone means to prevent me from loosening her hands.

To Andromache
Raise yourself up!

Andromache rises to her feet
Though I tremble with age, I will loosen the plaited thongs.

To Menelaus
Did you, base coward, mar her hands thus? [720] Was it a bull or a lion you thought you were tying up with the noose? Or were you afraid that she might take a sword and wreak vengeance on you?

To Molossus
Come here under my arm, child, and help me to untie your mother's bonds. In Phthia I shall bring you to manhood to be a great enemy to these people. If you Spartans [725] did not have your reputation won by spear-fighting, you may be sure that in other respects you are no one's superior.

Chorus Leader
Old men are a thing that knows no restraint and are hard to keep a watch on because of their quick temper.

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hide References (3 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 1114
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