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Odysseus
Then listen to the punishment I have contrived for the knavish beast and our escape from slavery.

Chorus-Leader
Say on. I would not enjoy hearing the sound of the Asian lyre more than the news of the Cyclops' death!

Odysseus
[445] He wants to go to his brother Cyclopes for a revel since he is delighted with this drink of Dionysus.

Chorus-Leader
I take your drift. You are eager to catch him by himself in the woods and cut his throat or push him off a cliff.

Odysseus
No, nothing like that. My desire is for something cunning.

Chorus-Leader
[450] What is it then? We have long heard about your cleverness.

Odysseus
To begin with, I want to keep him from going on this revel by telling him he shouldn't give the other Cyclopes this drink but keep it to himself and live a life of pleasure. But when he falls asleep, overcome by Dionysus, [455] there is an olive-stake in his hall, whose tip, when I have sharpened it with this sword of mine, I shall put into the fire. Then when I see it burnt, I shall lift it hot and poke it into the Cyclops' face and melt his eye with the fire. [460] And just as a ship's joiner whirls his auger with a pair of thongs, so I shall drill the brand into the Cyclops' orb of vision and burn out his eyeball.

Chorus-Leader
Hurrah! [465] I am driven frantic with joy by your inventions!

Odysseus
Then I shall put you and my friends and your old father on board my black ship, and with paired oars I shall set off from this land.

Chorus-Leader
Is there any way that I too could put my hand, as men do with a libation to the gods, [470] to the brand that will blind the Cyclops? I want to have a part in this blood-letting.

Odysseus
You must, for the brand is big and you must help to hold it.

Chorus-Leader
I could lift the weight of a hundred wagons if we are going to smoke out that cursed Cyclops' [475] eye like a wasps' nest.

Odysseus
Then hold your tongue—you now know my plan—and when I give the word, do what the master-builder tells you to. I shall not leave behind my friends in the cave and save myself alone. [ [480] And yet I could flee, and I have come out of the cave, but it is not right to leave behind my friends with whom I came here and save myself alone.]

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hide References (4 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, Commentary on the Odyssey (1886), 9.383
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), TE´REBRA
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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