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Now the zeal of the rival disputants was [130] almost equal, until that shifty, smooth-mouthed liar, the son of Laertes, whose tongue is always at the service of the mob, persuaded the army not to put aside the best of all the Danaids [135] for want of a servant-maid's sacrifice, nor have it said by any of the dead that stand beside Persephone that the Danaids have left the plains of Troy without gratitude [140] for their companions who died for Hellas. Odysseus will be here in an instant, to drag the tender maiden from your breast and tear her from your aged arms. Go to the temples, go to the altars, [145] at Agamemnon's knees sit as a suppliant! Invoke the gods, both those in heaven and those beneath the earth. For either your prayers will avail to spare you the loss of your unhappy child, [150] or you must see your daughter fall before the tomb, her crimson blood spurting in deep dark jets from her neck encircled with gold.

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    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 148
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