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Chorus Leader
O Zeus, why have you shown such savage hate against your own son and plunged him in this sea of troubles?

Heracles
waking
Aha! I am alive and breathing; and my eyes see what they should, [1090] the sky and earth and the sun's darting beam; but how my senses reel! in what strange turmoil am I plunged! my fevered breath in quick spasmodic gasps escapes my lungs. How now? why am I lying here, my brawny chest and arms made fast with cables like a ship, [1095] beside a half-shattered piece of masonry, with corpses for my neighbors; while over the floor my bow and arrows are scattered, that once like trusty squires to my arm [1100] both kept me safe and were kept safe by me? Surely I have not come a second time to Hades' halls, having just returned from there for Eurystheus? To Hades? From where? No, I do not see Sisyphus with his stone, or Pluto, or his queen, Demeter's child. [1105] Surely I am distraught; where am I, so helpless? Ho, there! which of my friends is near or far to cure me in my ignorance? For I have no clear knowledge of things once familiar.

Amphitryon
My aged friends, shall I approach the scene of my sorrow?

Chorus Leader
[1110] Yes, and let me go with you, not desert you in your trouble.

Heracles
Father, why do you weep and veil your eyes, standing far from your beloved son?

Amphitryon
My child! mine still, for all your misery.

Heracles
Why, what is there so sad in my case that you weep?

Amphitryon
[1115] That which might make any of the gods weep, if he were to learn it.

Heracles
A bold assertion that, but you are not yet explaining what has happened.

Amphitryon
Your own eyes see that, if by this time you are restored to your senses.

Heracles
Fill in your sketch if any change awaits my life.

Amphitryon
I will explain, if you are no longer mad as a fiend of hell.

Heracles
[1120] Oh! what suspicions these dark hints of yours again excite!

Amphitryon
I am still doubtful whether you are in your sober senses.

Heracles
I have no recollection of being mad.

Amphitryon
Am I to loose my son, old friends, or what shall I do?

Heracles
Loose me, yes, and say who bound me; for I feel shame at this.

Amphitryon
[1125] Rest content with what you know of your woes; the rest forego.

Heracles
No. for is silence sufficient to learn what I wish?

Amphitryon
O Zeus, do you behold these deeds proceeding from the throne of Hera?

Heracles
What! have I suffered something from her enmity?

Amphitryon
A truce to the goddess! attend to your own troubles.

Heracles
[1130] I am undone; you will tell me some mischance.

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hide References (2 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Electra, 1476
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