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But the strange visions which the night brought with it, I will tell to the air, if that is any relief. I dreamed that I had left this land [45] to live in Argos, and to sleep in the midst of the maidens' rooms; but the earth's back was shaken by a tossing swell. When I escaped and stood outside, I saw the cornice of the house fall, and the whole roof hurled in ruins on the ground, from the highest pillars. [50] One support of my father's house was left, I thought, and it had yellow locks of hair waving from its capital, and took on human voice. In observance of the art of slaughtering strangers that I practice here, I gave it holy water as if it were about to die, while I wept. [55] This is my interpretation of this dream: Orestes, whom I consecrated by my rites, is dead. For male children are the supports of the house; and those whom I purify with holy water die. [I cannot connect this dream to my friends, [60] for Strophius, when I perished, had no son.] Now I wish to give libations to my brother, though he is absent from me—for I would be able to do this—with the attendants given me by the king, Hellene women. But why [65] are they not yet here? I will go inside this temple of the goddess where I live.She goes into the temple. Orestes and Pylades enter cautiously.

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    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus, 513-862
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