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Chorus
Sing me, Muse, a tale of Troy, a funeral dirge in strains unheard as yet, with tears; [515] for now I will uplift for Troy a piteous chant, telling how I met my doom and fell a wretched captive to the Argives by reason of a four-footed beast that moved on wheels, when Achaea's sons left at our.gates that horse, [520] loud rumbling to the sky, with its trappings of gold and its freight of warriors; and our people cried out as they stood upon the rocky citadel, “Up now, you whose toil is over, [525] and drag this sacred image to the shrine of the Zeus-born maiden, goddess of our Ilium!” Forth from his house came every youth and every grey-head too; and with songs of joy [530] they took the fatal snare within.

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Troy (Turkey) (2)
Ilium (Turkey) (1)
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    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 411
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