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[750] So saying he made for the warrior Cebriones with the rush of a lion that, while he wasteth the farm-stead, hath been smitten on the breast, and his own valour bringeth him to ruin; even so upon Cebriones, O Patroclus, didst thou leap furiously. [755] And Hector over against him leapt from his chariot to the ground. So the twain joined in strife for Cebriones like two lions, that on the peaks of a mountain fight for a slain hind, both of them hungering, both high of heart; even so for Cebriones the two masters of the war-cry, [760] even Patroclus, son of Menoetius, and glorious Hector, were fain each to cleave the other's flesh with the pitiless bronze. Hector, when once he had seized the corpse by the head, would not loose his hold, and Patroclus over against him held fast hold of the foot; and about them the others, Trojans and Danaans, joined in fierce conflict. [765] And as the East Wind and the South strive with one another in shaking a deep wood in the glades of a mountain,—a wood of beech and ash and smooth-barked cornel, and these dash one against the other their long boughs with a wondrous din, and there is a crashing of broken branches; [770] even so the Trojans and Achaeans leapt one upon another and made havoc, nor would either side take thought of ruinous flight. And round about Cebriones many sharp spears were fixed, and many winged arrows that leapt from the bow-string, and many great stones smote against shields, as men fought around him. [775] But he in the whirl of dust lay mighty in his mightiness, forgetful of his horsemanship.

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  • Commentary references to this page (4):
    • W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, Commentary on the Odyssey (1886), 12.404
    • W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, Commentary on the Odyssey (1886), 2.236
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 17.723
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 18.26
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