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Of the Dardanians again the valiant son of Anchises was captain, [820] even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting. And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, [825] men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow. And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, [830] these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. [835] And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. [840] And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus. But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, [845] even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth. And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus. But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— [850] Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth. And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy1 heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius [855] and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini. But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver.

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hide References (7 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (4):
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 20.484
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 4.520
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 6.7
    • Thomas D. Seymour, Commentary on Homer's Iliad, Books IV-VI, 4.520
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
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