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These then with high hearts abode the whole night through along the dykes of war, and their fires burned in multitudes. [555] Even as in heaven about the gleaming moon the stars shine clear, when the air is windless, and forth to view appear all mountain peaks and high headlands and glades, and from heaven breaketh open the infinite air,1 and all stars are seen, and the shepherd joyeth in his heart; [560] even in such multitudes between the ships and the streams of Xanthus shone the fires that the Trojans kindled before the face of Ilios. A thousand fires were burning in the plain and by each sat fifty men in the glow of the blazing fire. And their horses, eating of white barley and spelt, [565] stood beside the cars and waited for fair-throned Dawn.

1 379.1

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hide References (3 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Thomas D. Seymour, Commentary on Homer's Iliad, Books I-III, 2.129
    • Thomas D. Seymour, Commentary on Homer's Iliad, Books I-III, 2.815
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