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"I stuck to the ship till the sea knocked her sides from her keel (which drifted about by itself) and struck the mast out of her in the direction of the keel; but there was a backstay of stout ox-thong still hanging about it, and with this I lashed the mast and keel together, and getting astride of them was carried wherever the winds chose to take me.

"The gale from the West had now spent its force, and the wind got into the South again, which frightened me lest I should be taken back to the terrible whirlpool of Charybdis. This indeed was what actually happened, for I was borne along by the waves all night, and by sunrise had reached the rock of Scylla, and the whirlpool. She was then sucking down the salt sea water, but I was carried aloft toward the fig tree, which I caught hold of and clung on to like a bat. I could not plant my feet anywhere so as to stand securely, for the roots were a long way off and the boughs that overshadowed the whole pool were too high, too vast, and too far apart for me to reach them; so I hung patiently on, waiting till the pool should discharge my mast and raft again - and a very long while it seemed. A juryman [krînô] is not more glad to get home to supper, after having been long detained in court by troublesome cases, than I was to see my raft beginning to work its way out of the whirlpool again. At last I let go with my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, hard by my raft on to which I then got, and began to row with my hands. As for Scylla, the father of gods and men would not let her get further sight of me - otherwise I should have certainly been lost.

"Hence I was carried along for nine days till on the tenth night the gods stranded me on the Ogygian island, where dwells the great and powerful goddess Calypso. She took me in and was kind to me, but I need say no more about this, for I told you and your noble wife all about it yesterday, and it is hateful [ekhthron] for me to say the same thing over and over again."

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load focus Notes (W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, 1886)
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hide References (10 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (3):
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 16.406
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 24.80
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 5.487
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), OPSON
    • Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae, Ath. 1.22
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (3):
  • Cross-references in text-specific dictionaries to this page (2):
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