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[47]

After he had taken over the government of the city, which had been reduced to a state of barbarism and, because it was ruled by Phoenicians, was neither hospitable to the Greeks nor acquainted with the arts, nor possessed of a trading-port or harbor, Evagoras remedied all these defects and, besides, acquired much additional territory, surrounded it all with new walls and built triremes, and with other construction so increased the city that it was inferior to none of the cities of Greece. And he caused it to become so powerful that many who formerly despised it, now feared it.1

1 See Isoc. 4.141 for the fleet and army of Evagoras.

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  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Edward S. Forster, Isocrates Cyprian Orations, 34
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  • Cross-references in notes from this page (1):
    • Isocrates, Panegyricus, 141
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