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17. The new consuls then took over the army1 from their predecessors, and entering the enemy's territory laid it waste as far as their city walls. [2] at this juncture, since the Sidicini had themselves raised an enormous army and seemed likely to make a desperate struggle in behalf of their last hope, and since the rumour went that Samnium was arming, the senate authorized the consuls to nominate a dictator. [3] they appointed Publius Cornelius Rufinus, and Marcus Antonius was made master of the horse. [4] [p. 69]ascruple was subsequently raised about the regularity2 of their appointment, and they resigned their office; and when a pestilence ensued, it was supposed that all the auspices were affected by that irregularity, and the state reverted to an interregnum.

[5] finally Marcus Valerius Corvus, the fifth interrex from the beginning of the interregnum, achieved the election to the consulship of Aulus Cornelius (for the second time) and Gnaeus Domitius. [6] coming, as it did, when all was tranquil, the rumour of a Gallic war worked like an actual rising, and caused the senate to have recourse to a dictator. Marcus Papirius Crassus was the man, and he named Publius Valerius Publicola master of the horse. [7] while they were conducting their levy, more strenuously than they would have done for a war against a neighbouring state, scouts were sent out, and returned with the report that all was quiet amongst the Gauls. [8] Samnium likewise had now for two years been suspected of hatching revolutionary schemes, for which reason the Roman army was not withdrawn from the Sidicine country. [9] but an invasion by Alexander of Epirus drew the Samnites off into Lucania, and these two peoples engaged in a pitched battle with the King, as he was marching up from Paestum. [10] The victory remained with Alexander, who then made a treaty of peace with the Romans; with what faith he intended to keep it, had the rest of his campaign been equally successful, is a question.

[11] in this same year the census was taken and new citizens were assessed. on their account the Maecian and Scaptian tribes were added.3 The censors who added them were Quintus Publilius Philo and [p. 71]Spurius [12] Postumius. The people of Acerra became4 Romans under a statute, proposed by the praetor Lucius Papirius, which granted them citizenship without the suffrage. such were the events of this year at home and in the field.

1 B.C. 332

2 B.C. 332

3 The Maecian tribe was presumably named from Castrum Maecium (near Lanuvium) mentioned at vi. ii. 8, and the Scaptian from the town of Scaptia which lay between Tibur and Tusculum. The number of tribes was thus raised to twenty —nine.

4 B.C. 332

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  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.24
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.26
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.36
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.16
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.10
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.9
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.8
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  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (12):
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