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11. There was a certain soldier of Antiochus who had come to Samos on private business, and was arrested as a spy and taken to Panhormus to the prefect. [2] When the prefect asked what was going on at Ephesus —it is uncertain whether it was because of fear or from disloyalty to his own people —he [3] revealed everything: the fleet, arrayed and equipped, was in the harbour; all the rowers had been sent to Magnesia; a few ships had been beached and the docks dismantled; never had greater energy been devoted to naval matters. That this story was not accepted as the truth was due to a mind preoccupied with falsehood and delusive hope. [4] Polyxenidas, having now completed his arrangements and summoned the rowers by night from Magnesia, hastily launched the ships which had been drawn up on the shore, and when he had spent a day not so much in preparation as because he did not want the departing [5??] fleet to be seen, he set out after sunset, the wind being favourable, with seventy decked ships and before daylight reached the harbour of Pygela. He rested there by day for the same reason and during the next night crossed to the Samian country. [6] Then he directed Nicander, a certain pirate chief, to proceed to Palinurus with five decked ships and then to lead the marines by the shortest road through the [p. 323]fields to Panhormus to take the enemy in the rear,1 and he himself in the meantime, dividing the fleet that he might hold the entrance to the harbour on both sides, set out for Panhormus. [7] Pausistratus at first, as one in an unexpected situation, was terrified for a while, then, being a veteran soldier, he quickly collected his thoughts and decided that it was better to resist [8??] the enemy on land than on sea, and led the troops in two columns to the promontories which, like horns projecting into the sea, form the harbour, expecting to repel the enemy easily with weapons falling upon them from both sides. When the sight of Nicander, coming by land, had upset this plan, he suddenly changed his intention and ordered them all to go aboard the ships. [9] Then there was great confusion among the marines and sailors, and a sort of flight to the ships began, when they saw themselves surrounded by land and sea at once. [10] Pausistratus thought that there was one way of safety, if he could force a way through the entrance of the harbour and escape into the open sea, and when he saw that all had embarked he ordered the rest to follow him, and at the head of the columns urging his ship forward with the oars, he made for the entrance of the harbour. [11] As the ship was passing the entrance Polyxenidas with three quinqueremes surrounded it. The ship was struck by the beaks and sunk; the defenders were overwhelmed with missiles, and among them Pausistratus too, fighting bravely, was killed. [12] Some of the remaining ships were taken outside the harbour and others inside, and some were captured by Nicander as they were pushing off from the beach; [13] only five Rhodian and two Coan ships escaped, making a way for [p. 325]themselves among the crowded vessels by means of2 the fear of darting flames; for each, with two poles projecting from their prows, carried ahead of it a great quantity of fire in iron drums.3 [14] When the triremes of Erythrae had met, not far from Samos, the fleeing Rhodian ships which they were coming to assist, they turned their course toward the Hellespont and the Romans. [15] About the same time Seleucus recovered Phocaea, which was betrayed when one gate was opened by the sentinels; and Cyme and other towns of the same region revolted to him from fear.

1 B.C. 190

2 B.C. 190

3 Polybius (XXI. vi) describes these contrivances in greater detail. The drums or scoops were swung from the poles and could be tripped by suitable chains from the deck to spill fire on ships that approached.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1873)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
hide References (50 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (12):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.1
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.41
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.43
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.7
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.10
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.16
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.7
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 41.23
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.18
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.23
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.42
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.36
  • Cross-references to this page (21):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Magnesia
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Nicander
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Panormus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Pausistratus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Polyxenidas
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Portus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Pygela
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Rhodii
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Samia
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Seleucus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Sipontum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Triremes
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cyme
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Erythraei
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Flamma
    • Harper's, Trulla
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), SAMOS
    • Smith's Bio, Nicander
    • Smith's Bio, Pausi'stratus
    • Smith's Bio, Polyxe'nidas
    • Smith's Bio, Seleucus Iv. or Seleucus Philopator
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (17):
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