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The king's return to Macedonia inflicted as much suffering on both man and beast as they had endured in the advance upon Stratus. However, the report of Perseus's march to that city was sufficient to make Appius abandon the siege of Phanote. [2] On his retreat he was followed up by Clenas with a body of vigorous and untiring troops to the almost impassable spurs of the mountain range, and 1000 of his men were killed and 200 made prisoners. [3] Appius struggled through the pass, and remained for a few days in camp in what is known as the Plain of Meleon. [4] Meanwhile Clenas, who had been joined by Philostratus commanding a force of Epirots, invaded the district round Antigonea. The Macedonians went out to devastate the country and Philostratus with his cohort formed an ambush in a darkly overshadowed spot. [5] When the troops in Antigonea hurried out to attack the scattered plunderers, the latter fled and carried their pursuers headlong into the hollow where the ambush was set; 1000 were killed and about 100 made prisoners. As they had been everywhere successful, they moved their camp near to Appius's permanent encampment, to prevent the Roman army from inflicting any injury on the cities which were friendly to them. [6] Appius had been wasting his time in this locality; he sent home the Chaonians and all the Epirots who were with him; returned to Illyria with his Italian soldiers; sent his men into winter quarters in the different cities, and then returned to Rome to offer sacrifices. [7] Perseus recalled 1000 infantry and 200 cavalry from Penestia and sent them to garrison Cassandrea. [8] The envoys who had been sent again to Gentius returned with the same reply, but Perseus persisted in sending fresh envoys time after time; he quite saw what a valuable support he would be to him, but he could not bring himself to spend money over a thing which was in every way of the utmost importance.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
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load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (English, Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D., 1951)
load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D., 1951)
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  • Commentary references to this page (12):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.13
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.5
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.26
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.8
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.38
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.10
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.20
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.28
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.31
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.32
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.26
  • Cross-references to this page (17):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Parthini
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Penestas
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Stratus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, M. Trebellius Fregellanus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Templum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Arachthus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Archidamus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cassandrea
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Citius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, L. Coelius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Elimea
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ANTIGONEIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PENESTAE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PHA´NOTE
    • Smith's Bio, Archede'mus
    • Smith's Bio, Perseus
    • Smith's Bio, Philo'stratus
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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