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Between this and the hero-shrine of Alcathous, which in my day the Megarians used as a record office, was the tomb, they said, of Pyrgo, the wife of Alcathous before he married Euaechme, the daughter of Megareus, and the tomb of Iphinoe, the daughter of Alcathous; she died, they say, a maid. It is customary for the girls to bring libations to the tomb of Iphiaoe and to offer a lock of their hair before their wedding, just as the daughters of the Delians once cut their hair for Hecaerge and Opis.

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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 5.88
    • W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, Commentary on the Odyssey (1886), 19.266
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