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[53] were then marched to the bath-room and scrubbed, and thence to their cells. Seven days afterward forty-two more of General Morgan's officers were sent from Johnson's Island to the penitentiary, and subjected to the same indignities. On the 30th of July, 1863, I was informed by the Federal agent of exchange, General Meredith, “that General John H. Morgan and his officers will be placed in close confinement, and held as hostages for the members of Colonel Streight's command.” I replied, on the 1st of August, that Colonel Streight's command was treated exactly as were other officers. On the 28th of August I wrote another letter, asking the Federal Agent whether he wished Colonel Streight to be shaved and put in a felon's cell, and suggesting, if he did, that the Federal authorities were pursuing exactly the course to secure that result. To that letter I received the following reply, which I will give entire, as something of a portrait of the man I was dealing with:

Fortress Monroe, September 30th, 1863.
Hon. Robert Ould, Agent of Exchange, Richmond, Va.:
Sir:--Had I succeeded, after waiting thirty hours, in obtaining an interview with you, when I was last at City Point, I had intended to explain to you that the United States authorities had nothing to do with the treatment that General Morgan and his command received when imprisoned at Columbus. Such treatment was wholly unauthorized.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. A. Meredith, Brigadier General and Commissioner for Exchange.

A few days after the receipt of this letter, General Meredith informed me that General Morgan and his officers were held for others than “the members of Colonel Streight's command.” He showed me a letter from General Hitchcock, in which the same statement was made. Thus it appears that I was first notified that General Morgan and his officers would be placed in close confinement for the members of Streight's command-then two months afterward I was informed that the United States had nothing to do with the treatment that General Morgan and his command received --and then I was told that General Morgan and his officers were not held for the members of Colonel Streight's command. Yet, during all this time, and for a long time afterward, General Morgan and his officers were continued in the penitentiary, and compelled to suffer all the indignities of felon life. It taxes credulity too much to believe that the United States were not responsible for the treatment they received, sent there as they were by General Burnside, and kept there by the United States War Department.

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