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Again the same poet, in the Phoenix, 1 expresses his opinion, making defence against false charges brought by the father, and trying to persuade men habitually to judge, not under the influence of suspicion or of slander, but by a man's life:

““Many a time ere now have I been made
The judge in men's disputes, and oft have heard
For one event conflicting witnesses.
And so, to find the truth, I, as do all
Wise men, look sharp to see the character
That marks the daily life, and judge by that.
The man who loves companionship of knaves
I care not to interrogate. What need
Is there? I know too well the man is such
As is the company he loves to keep.”

Euripides

1 No. 812, Nauck.

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