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Atossa
For this very reason I have left the gold-decorated palace [160] and the chamber which belongs to Darius and myself, and have come here. My heart, too, is racked with anxiety, and to you, my friends, will I make a disclosure. For I am by no means free from apprehension that wealth, grown great, will, raising a cloud of dust upon the ground, trip up the prosperity which Darius raised not without the favor of some god. [165] It is for this reason that there is a double concern in my mind: neither to hold in honor vast wealth without men, and that the light of success does not shine, in proportion to their strength, on men without riches. Our wealth, at all events, is ample, but my anxiety is for the light, the salvation of the house, which I regard to be the presence of its lord. [170] Therefore, since things stand as they do, lend me your counsel in this concern, Persians, my aged trusty servants. For all my hopes of good counsel depend on you.

Chorus
Be assured, our country's Queen, that you need not twice mention either word or deed regarding that in which it is possible for us to direct you. [175] For we whom you summon as counsellors in these matters are well disposed towards you and your interests.

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