previous next
[278] No upright and honor able citizen must ever expect a jury impanelled in the public service to bolster up his own resentment or enmity or other passions, nor will he go to law to gratify them. If possible he will exclude them from his heart: if he cannot escape them, he will at least cherish them calmly and soberly. In what circumstances, then, ought a politician or an orator to be vehement? When all our national interests are imperilled; when the issue lies between the people and their adversaries. Then such is the part of a chivalrous and patriotic citizen.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (William Watson Goodwin)
load focus Greek (1903)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (7 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • William Watson Goodwin, Commentary on Demosthenes: On the Crown, 178
    • William Watson Goodwin, Commentary on Demosthenes: On the Crown, 279
    • William Watson Goodwin, Commentary on Demosthenes: On the Crown, 28
    • William Watson Goodwin, Commentary on Demosthenes: On the Crown, 303
    • William Watson Goodwin, Commentary on Demosthenes: On the Crown, 321
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: