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[13] This law, then, ordains that we should live as citizens under the same laws and not one under one law, another under another. But my father died during the archonship of Dysnicetus,1 and Phormio became an Athenian citizen during the archonship of Nicophemus,2 in the tenth year after my father died. How, then, could my father, not knowing that Phormio was to become an Athenian citizen, have given him in marriage his own wife, and thus have outraged us, shown his contempt of the gift of citizenship which he had received from you, and disregarded your laws? And which was the more honorable course for him—to do this during his lifetime, supposing he wished to do it, or to leave behind him at his death a will which he had no legal right to make?

1 That is, in 371-370 B.C.

2 That is, in 361-360 B.C.

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    • J. E. Sandys, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 3
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    • J. E. Sandys, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 17
    • J. E. Sandys, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 3
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