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Kadmos
O grief beyond measuring, one which I cannot stand to see, [1245] that you have performed murder with miserable hands. Having cast down a fine sacrificial victim to the gods, you invite Thebes and me to a banquet. Alas, first for your troubles, then for my own. How justly, yet too severely, [1250] lord Bromius the god has destroyed us, though he is a member of our own family.

Agave
How morose and sullen in its countenance is man's old age! I hope that my son is a good hunter, taking after his mother's ways, when he goes after wild beasts [1255] together with the young men of Thebes. But all he can do is fight with the gods. You must admonish him, father. Who will call him here to my sight, so that he may see how lucky I am?

Kadmos
Alas, alas! When you realize what you have done [1260] you will suffer a terrible pain. But if you remain forever in the state you are in now, though hardly fortunate, you will not imagine that you are unfortunate.

Agave
But what of these matters is not right, or what is painful?

Kadmos
First cast your eye up to this sky.

Agave
[1265] All right; why do you tell me to look at it?

Kadmos
Is it still the same, or does it appear to have changed?

Agave
It is brighter than before and more translucent.

Kadmos
Is your soul still quivering?

Agave
I don't understand your words. I have become somehow [1270] sobered, changing from my former state of mind.

Kadmos
Can you hear and respond clearly?

Agave
Yes, for I forget what we said before, father.

Kadmos
To whose house did you come in marriage?

Agave
You gave me, as they say, to Echion, the sown man.

Kadmos
[1275] What son did you bear to your husband in the house?

Agave
Pentheus, from my union with his father.

Kadmos
Whose head do you hold in your hands?

Agave
A lion's, as they who hunted him down said.

Kadmos
Examine it correctly then; it takes but little effort to see.

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