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Theoklymenos
to an attendant
You, go and give them a Sidonian ship of fifty oars, and rowers also.

Helen
This man who is ordering the funeral will be in command of the ship, won't he?

Theoklymenos
[1415] Most certainly; my sailors must obey him.

Helen
Repeat the order, so that they may clearly understand you.

Theoklymenos
I repeat the order, and a third time too, if you wish it.

Helen
May you have benefit from it—and I from my plans!

Thoeklymenos
Do not ruin your skin with too much weeping now.

Helen
[1420] This day will show my gratitude to you.

Theoklymenos
The state of the dead is nothingness; toil for them is vain.

Helen
There is something of what I say both there and here.

Theoklymenos
You will not find in me a husband at all inferior to Menelaos.

Helen
You are not at fault in any way; good luck is all I need.

Theoklymenos
[1425] That is in your power, if you show kindness to me.

Helen
This is not a lesson I shall have to learn now, to love my friends.

Theoklymenos
Would you like me to send out the equipment in person, working together with you?

Helen
Not at all! Do not become a slave to your slaves, lord.

Theoklymenos
Come then! I have no concern with the customs of the race of Pelops. [1430] My house is pure; for Menelaos did not die here. Let someone go and tell my chieftans to bring marriage-offerings to my house; the whole earth must ring with joyful wedding-songs [1435] in celebration of my wedding with Helen, so that it may be envied. You, stranger, go and give to the sea's embrace these offerings to this woman's husband, who was once alive; and then hurry back home with my wife, so that after sharing with me her marriage-feast, you may [1440] set out for home or remain here in happiness.Theoklymenos and his retinue enter the palace.

Menelaos
O Zeus, called father and god of wisdom, look on us and alter our woes! As we drag our fortunes to the rocky hill, make haste to join with us; if you touch us with your finger-tip only, [1445] we shall reach our longed-for goal. There has been enough distress in what we have suffered before. I have invoked you, gods, with many names, good and painful; I am not bound to be unfortunate forever, but to advance in a straight course. If you grant me one favor, [1450] you will make me fortunate hereafter.Menelaos, Helen and their train of attendants depart.

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