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Orestes
Who will sacrifice me and dare such a dreadful deed ?

Iphigenia
I will; for I hold the office of this goddess.

Orestes
It is not envied, lady, and not blessed.

Iphigenia
[620] But I am dedicated to necessity, which must be kept.

Orestes
Do you yourself, a woman, sacrifice men with the sword?

Iphigenia
No; but I sprinkle the holy water around your hair.

Orestes
Who is the slayer? If I may ask this.

Iphigenia
That charge belongs to those within this temple.

Orestes
[625] What sort of tomb will receive me, when I die?

Iphigenia
The sacred fire within and the wide hollow of a cave.

Orestes
Ah! Would that my sister's hand might lay out my body!

Iphigenia
You have prayed in vain, unhappy youth, whoever you are; for she lives far from a barbarian land. [630] Yet indeed, since you happen to be an Argive, I too will not leave out any favor that I can do. I will set much ornament on the tomb and quench your body with yellow oil, and throw onto your funeral pyre the gleaming honey, that streams from flowers, [635] of the tawny mountain bee. But I will go and bring the tablet from the temple of the goddess; take care not to bear me ill-will.

Guard them, attendants, without chains. Perhaps I will send unexpected news to one of my friends, [640] whom I especially love, in Argos; and the tablet, in telling him that those whom he thought dead are alive, will report a joy that can be believed.She enters the temple.

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