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[112] while they with the combined strength of Hellas found it difficult to take Troy after a siege which lasted ten years, he, on the other hand, in less than as many days, and with a small expedition, easily took the city by storm. After this, he put to death to a man all the princes1 of the tribes who dwelt along the shores of both continents2; and these he could never have destroyed had he not first conquered their armies. When he had done these things, he set up the Pillars of Heracles, as they are called, to be a trophy of victory over the barbarians, a monument to his own valor and the perils he had surmounted, and to mark the bounds of the territory of the Hellenes.

1 Chiefs, of barbarian tribes, such as Diomedes, Mygdon, Sarpedon, Busiris, Antaeus.

2 Europe and Asia. Cf. Isoc. 4.35.

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    • Isocrates, Panegyricus, 35
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