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[23a] many enmities have arisen against me, and such as are most harsh and grievous, so that many prejudices have resulted from them and I am called a wise man. For on each occasion those who are present think I am wise in the matters in which I confute someone else; but the fact is, gentlemen, it is likely that the god is really wise and by his oracle means this: “Human wisdom is of little or no value.” And it appears that he does not really say this of Socrates, but merely uses my name,

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  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus, 216-462
    • R. G. Bury, The Symposium of Plato, 198D
    • R. G. Bury, The Symposium of Plato, 220B
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XXX
    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 5.449D
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, PARTICLES
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Copula
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
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