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[47a] are not involved in the necessity of dying tomorrow, and therefore present conditions would not lead your judgment astray. Now say, do you not think we were correct in saying that we ought not to esteem all the opinions of men, but some and not others, and not those of all men, but only of some? What do you think? Is not this true?

Crito
It is.

Socrates
Then we ought to esteem the good opinions and not the bad ones?

Crito
Yes.

Socrates
And the good ones are those of the wise and the bad ones those of the foolish?

Crito
Of course.

Socrates
Come then, what used we to say about this? [47b] If a man is an athlete and makes that his business, does he pay attention to every man's praise and blame and opinion or to those of one man only who is a physician or a trainer?

Crito
To those of one man only.

Socrates
Then he ought to fear the blame and welcome the praise of that one man and not of the multitude.

Crito
Obviously.

Socrates
And he must act and exercise and eat and drink as the one man who is his director and who knows the business thinks best rather than as all the others think.

Crito
That is true. [47c]

Socrates
Well then; if he disobeys the one man and disregards his opinion and his praise, but regards words of the many who have no special knowledge, will he not come to harm?

Crito
Of course he will.

Socrates
And what is this harm? In what direction and upon what part of the one who disobeys does it act?

Crito
Evidently upon his body; for that is what it ruins.

Socrates
Right. Then in other matters, not to enumerate them all, in questions of right and wrong and disgraceful and noble and good and bad, which we are now considering, ought we to follow and fear [47d] the opinion of the many or that of the one, if there is anyone who knows about them, whom we ought to revere and fear more than all the others? And if we do not follow him, we shall injure and cripple that which we used to say is benefited by the right and is ruined by the wrong. Or is there nothing in this?

Crito
I think it is true, Socrates.

Socrates
Well then, if through yielding to the opinion of the ignorant we ruin that which is benefited by health and injured by disease, [47e] is life worth living for us when that is ruined? And that is the body, is it not?

Crito
Yes.

Socrates
Then is life worth living when the body is worthless and ruined?

Crito
Certainly not.

Socrates
But is it worth living when that is ruined which is injured by the wrong and improved by the right? Or do we think that part of us, whatever it is, which is concerned with right and wrong,


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