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[154d] the present question, I should say “no,” but if I consider the earlier question, I should say “yes,” for fear of contradicting myself.

Socrates
Good, by Hera! Excellent, my friend! But apparently, if you answer “yes” it will be in the Euripidean spirit; for our tongue will be unconvinced, but not our mind.1

Theaetetus
True.

Socrates
Well, if you and I were clever and wise and had found out everything about the mind, we should henceforth spend the rest of our time testing each other out of the fulness of our wisdom,


1 Eur. Hipp. 612 γλῶσσ᾽ ὀμώμοχ᾽, δὲ φρὴν ἀνώμοτος, “my tongue has sworn, but my mind is unsworn.”

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